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July 14, 2015

Registration for Conducting Implementation-Informed Evaluations:
Practical Applications and Lessons from Implementation Science

 

Hello Division H'ers

Below please find the registration information for the August 19 webinar. The direct link to the webinar info + registration page is https://relmidatlantic.org/public_event/conducting-implementation-informed-evaluations-practical applications-and-lessons.

Thanks Teresa Duncan and Rolf Blank and all who worked with you for organizing this session.

Zollie


 

 

July 7, 2015

Division H Professional Development Webinar: Implementation Science

Our next webinar for Division H members will be August 19,th 1-2:30pm. 

The title of the webinar presentation is:  

 

Conducting Implementation Informed Evaluations: Practical applications and lessons from Implementation Science.

The presenter will be Dr. Caryn Ward, a specialist in Implementation Science with the National Implementation Research Network. Dr. Ward has worked with schools, district leaders, and states across the country. Please put the date on your calendar, and registration information will be sent shortly through our webinar organizing partner, REL Mid-Atlantic.

Creating meaningful change in educational organizations is complex and challenging. Over the past several decades, considerable research, policy, and funding have focused on the use of evidence-based practices. Evidence-based approaches, however, are only effective when fully implemented. So one may ask, how can a district or school define a new initiative and measure the changes that need to take place to ensure that new skills are learned and used, with a high level o

f fidelity, to ultimately improve outcomes for students? 

The purpose of this webinar is to provide practical illustrations and examples of using the Active Implementation Frameworks (AIFs) to accomplish system change and effective use of evidence based practices (Blase, Van Dyke, & Fixsen, 2014; Fixsen, Blase, Metz, & Van Dyke, 2013).

Participants in the webinar will:

  • Increase their knowledge and understanding of the Active Implementation Frameworks (AIF
  • Explore practical applications and illustrations of an implementation informed Decision Support Data System including fidelity assessments
  • Identify how Improvement Cycles (Rapid Cycle Problem Solving and Usability Testing) can be used to operationalize practices and effective implementation methods

In preparation for the webinar, participants are invited to view a brief (5 minute) video introduction to implementation science found on the Active Implementation Hub at https://unc-fpg-cdi.adobeconnect.com/_a992899727/ai-lesson-quickstart/.

2016 AERA Annual Meeting Call for Submissions Now Open

 Dear AERA Members and Past Annual Meeting Attendees,
 

 

I am writing to encourage you to participate in the 2016 AERA Annual Meeting. In AERA's Centennial Year, the Annual Meeting will be held Friday, April 8 – Tuesday, April 12 in Washington, DC. Jeannie Oakes, AERA President, Kevin G. Welner, Annual Meeting Program Chair, Michelle Renee, Annual Meeting Program Vice Chair, and the 2016 Program Committee, are pleased to announce this year’s Annual Meeting Theme: “Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies”. Now is the time to advance a paper or session submission for consideration by a division, special interest group,

 

or committee and to volunteer as a chair or discussant.
 
Deadline for Paper and Session Submissions is July 22
Please review the Call for Submissions as it contains important information about this year’s Annual Meeting theme and submission requirements. Please log in to advance a paper or session submission. After you login, click ‘My AERA’ at the top of the page. On the ‘My AERA’ page, scroll down to the 2016 Annual Meeting and click ‘Online Program Portal’.
 
Please pay special attention to the six elements that must be addressed in the narrative paper submissions even

 

if the results, conclusions, or findings are not complete or final at the time of the submission. Also, please indicate your preferred type of session and willingness to present in alternative formats at the time of submission.
 
The Professional Development Call for Proposals is also open. 
 
Volunteer to Serve as a Chair or Discussant by August 28
Please review the Call for Volunteer Session Chairs and Discussants and consider volunteering. Please log in to volunteer as a chair or discussant. The quality of the AERA Annual Meeting depends on education researchers with appropriate expertise who serve as chairs and discussants for paper sessions and roundtables.

 

 
Please contact the Meetings Team at annualmtg@aera.net or (202) 238-3200 with any questions and I look forward to your participation in an enriching 2016 Annual Meeting.
 
Kind regards,
 
Laurie Cipriano, CMP
Director of Meetings

 

 

Call for Proposals for Individual Presentations, Coordinated Sessions, and Training Sessions

Annual Meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education

Call for Proposals  - Deadline: August 1, 2015

 

The National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) invites you to submit a proposal for presentations and sessions at its Annual Meeting, April 7-11, 2016 in Washington, DC. NCME will accept the submission of proposals through Saturday, August 1 at 11:59 PM PDT.

 

Please review the full NCME Call for Proposals prior to submitting your proposal.

CONFERENCE THEME

The theme of the 2016 Annual Meeting is Foundations and Frontiers:  Advancing Educational Measurement for R

 

esearch, Policy, and Practice.   This theme acknowledges the variety of stakeholders that use educational assessments, including educators, policy makers, and researchers. Stakeholder uses of educational assessments are diversifying and expanding with the advent of new measurement methods and new methods of data collection. In this shifting environment, innovation is necessary, yet foundational principles of measurement, especially the concepts of validity and reliability, have never been more important. In recognition of both measurement foundations and measurement frontiers, the program committee seeks a broad range of proposals, in particular those that concern:

 

  • Relevant approaches for improving the reliability of assessment scores and the validity of their uses.
  • Novel methods of data collection and analysis.
  • The measurement and relevance of novel constructs related to education.
  • Novel applications and uses of educational assessment data. 
  • Understanding of problems posed by recent and future uses of test scores.
  • Solutions to these problems.

 

 On behalf of NCME, we are looking forward to the 78th Annual Meeting. With your help, we expect to have engaging, interactive, and stimulating sessions.

Be sure to submit your research and volunteer as a discussant and session chair for the Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, in 2016.

Andrew Ho and Matthew Johnson, Co-chairs, Annual Meeting Program Committee

Xin Li, Chair, Training and Professional Development

 

ProgramChairs@ncme.org

 

July 1, 2015

Link to the 2015 AERA Division H Presession - Improving Skills of School Leaders in Using Data to Drive Improvement:  Building on a Tested District Model – NOW AVAILABLE

Video from the Division H professional development and training course, PDC07 - Improving Skills of School Leaders in Using Data to Drive Improvement:  Building on a tested District model, during the 2015 American Educational Research A

ssociation (AERA) Annual Meeting in Chicago is now available. You can now view the course on-demand through the AERA

-Virtual Research Learning Center (VRLC).

To access the course through the VRLC you will need to create a free user account at: http://eo2.commpartners.com/

users/aera/. Once you have created your account you can add the recording of PDC07 - Improving Skills of School Leaders in Using Data to Drive Improvement:  Building on a tested District model by adding it to your cart at check-out using the following Discount Code: 150993.

All course materials and handouts can be downloaded from the VRLC website.  You will have unlimited access to the course for up to one year. For technical assistance please contact AERA at aera@commpartners.com or by phone at 800-274-9390.

Please visit the VRLC website (www.aera.net/vrlc) to learn about AERA’s professional development and research capacity–building trainings.

AERA Statement on the Charleston Shootings and Racism in America

Adopted in a Unanimous Resolution by the Council of the
American Educational Research Association on June 26, 2015 

The horrific deaths in Charleston, South Carolina, last week bear further witness to the troubling state of race relations and racism in the United States. These murders come as the country continues to grapple with deeply conflicted issues of race in American society that have become particularly visible in the last few years, with tragic deaths in Sanford, Florida; Ferguson, Missouri; Cleveland; Staten Island; and Baltimore. The Charleston massacre makes far too vivid that there is no safe place for those vulnerable to racism.

At the core of the collective national reaction to these events is the recognition that very real racial hate, prejudice, denigration, and disparities, whether or not intended, remain deeply embedded in American society and permeate everyday interactions among individuals and between individuals and societal institutions. This pervasiveness, with victims including boys and men, girls and women, young and old, has been examined and documented exhaustively by researchers. 

Yet we know far too little about how to intervene in or transcend this deeply rooted systemic problem. Education has both a responsibility and an opportunity. As the first social institution children experience outside of the family, education is a significant context of social and substantive learning related to hate, bigotry, and racism in society.  

At this time of great grief and bravery among the victimized families and communities, the American Educational Research Association expresses its deep sympathy. We call on the education research community to further commit itself to examining how school environments may exacerbate race bias and racism, how schools educate their students about such issues, and how mutual understanding and respect for all people can best be learned and taught. Researchers have a responsibility to address these issues, and government and private funders of education research are encouraged to support high-quality research initiatives.

It is also essential that educators and school leaders receive the tools, training, and support they need to build curricula with substantive exploration of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, and to provide students with meaningful opportunities to build their capacities for compassion, empathy, and acceptance.

Recent tragedies raise a broad range of societal and policy issues that are at the core of education and education research. Practitioners, policy makers, and scholars have a central role to play in addressing many of the underlying issues that have continued to tear at our country’s social fabric. It will take a concerted national effort to ensure that future generations are not beset by tragedies such as these.

AERA takes its own responsibility seriously. As a research organization, AERA will convene, communicate, and call upon the research community to use and produce the knowledge that is an essential part of eradicating racism in society.

AERA and ASHE Joint Resolution Regarding Tenure and Academic Freedom

AERA and ASHE Joint Resolution on Tenure and Academic Freedom in Wisconsin
Adopted and Issued by Both Organizations, June 30, 2015 

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), as the two national scholarly associations devoted to the study of all education and higher education, respectively, affirm the principle that academic freedom, grounded in the tenure process, is essential for high-quality research and teaching. As recently as 2014, both AERA and ASHE emphasized their longstanding commitment by endorsing the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure issued by the American Association of University Professors and the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Accordingly, AERA and ASHE urge policymakers in the state of Wisconsin, and at all levels of government, to protect against policies that would erode tenure and diminish academic freedom. The governing councils of AERA and ASHE endorse the American Historical Association’s (AHA) statement in support of tenure and academic freedom in Wisconsin, issued on June 11, 2015, in conjunction with 21 other scholarly societies.

The AHA statement reads as follows:

American Historical Association

June 11, 2015

Scholarly Associations Defend Tenure and Academic Freedom in Wisconsin

The American system of higher education is the envy of the world. It’s not perfect; few things are. But at a time when many Americans fear their nation may be falling behind competitively, U.S. colleges and universities continue to be universally regarded as the best in the world. The University of Wisconsin system, in particular, is noted for its standards of research and teaching excellence, with the Madison campus recognized among the top fifteen of American public universities by U.S. News and World Report. The University of Wisconsin is a critical contributor to the state’s economy that provides exceptional value with its thirteen campuses serving over 180,000 students. With $1.2 billion of state investment, the system generates over $15 billion of economic activity.

The undersigned associations of scholars across a wide variety of disciplines are gravely concerned with proposals pending in the Wisconsin legislature that threaten to undermine several longstanding features of the state’s current higher education system: shared governance, tenure, and academic freedom.

By situating the locus of control inside the institution, in a partnership between faculty and administrators, the U.S. system of higher education has generated an unmatched diversity that enables students to find the educational environment that works best for them. And by granting faculty tenure after an appropriate period during which their work is rigorously evaluated, we have ensured the continued intellectual vitality and classroom independence so essential to innovation, dynamism, and rigorous scholarship.

Academic freedom is the foundation of intellectual discovery, including in the classroom. It nourishes the environment within which students develop critical habits of mind through encounters with diverse perspectives, experiences, and sources of evidence across disciplines. Our democracy depends on the educated citizens that this system is intended to produce: wide-ranging in their knowledge, rigorous in their ability to understand complicated questions, and dedicated to the public good.

Wisconsin in fact helped pioneer the concept of academic freedom for the entire United States when its Board of Regents declared in 1894 that they would not terminate the employment of economist Richard Ely even though his research and teaching on the benefits of labor unions had offended one of its own members. The Regents’ report in the wake of that controversy remains one of the most ringing endorsements for academic freedom in the history of American higher education: “Whatever may be the limitations which trammel inquiry elsewhere,” they wrote, “we believe the great state University of Wisconsin should ever encourage that continual and fearless sifting and winnowing by which alone the truth can be found.”

The policies recommended by the Joint Finance Committee and included in the 2016 budget pose a direct threat to academic freedom by expanding the circumstances under which tenure can be revoked (beyond dire financial emergencies and just cause) while simultaneously removing its protection under state statute. Tenure is a linchpin of vigorous shared governance and independent rigorous scholarship. This assault on the structure of Wisconsin’s model arrangements poses a threat to the university’s stellar reputation and international leadership in research and education—and it betrays a celebrated Wisconsin tradition that began with the Ely case in 1894.

Since 1904, the “Wisconsin Idea” has stood as an inspiring educational model for the entire nation, demonstrating the immeasurable benefits of a robust partnership between the state university and state government predicated on intellectual independence and active engagement by students and faculty members with the wider world. An earlier draft of the current budget bill sought to remove language about the Wisconsin Idea from the mission statement of the university. This most recent draft now poses no less a threat by undermining several of the most important practical pillars of shared governance and academic freedom that have made Wisconsin a beacon among its peer institutions around the world.

Rather than making the University of Wisconsin system more fiscally nimble, the Joint Finance Committee recommendations threaten to damage, possibly irreparably, the distinguished educational system that has justifiably been the pride of Wisconsin residents for more than a century and a half.

Signed,

American Academy of Religion
American Anthropological Association
American Comparative Literature Association
American Folklore Society
American Historical Association
American Society of Comparative Law
American Society for Environmental History
American Sociological Association
American Studies Association
Association of College & Research Libraries
Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies
College Art Association
German Studies Association
Modern Language Association
National Communication Association
National Council on Public History
Oral History Association
Rhetoric Society of America
The Shakespeare Association of America
The Sixteenth Century Society and Conference
Society of Architectural Historians
World History Association

About AERA
The American Educational Research Association (AERA) is the largest national professional organization devoted to the scientific study of education. Founded in 1916, AERA advances knowledge about education, encourages scholarly inquiry related to education, and promotes the use of research to improve education and serve the public good. Find AERA on Facebook and Twitter.

About ASHE
The Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) is a scholarly society with about 2,000 members dedicated to higher education as a field of study. ASHE promotes collaboration among its members and others engaged in the study of higher education through research, conferences, and publications, including its highly regarded journal, The Review of Higher Education.

This statement is available online.

Invitations to Review Proposals for 2016 Division H Program Issued

Emails inviting volunteers to serve as reviewers of conference proposals recently were sent to Division H members. Volunteers have been asked to sit on review panels and evaluate proposals. We consider such service to be an honor and recognition of your qualifications to contribute to making meritorious decisions. We urge that you review this invitation. 

Thank you,

 

Brett D. Campbell, Ph.D.

2016 Division H Program Chair

bdcampbe@unlv.nevada.edu

 

2016 AERA Annual Meeting Call for Submissions Now Open

 Dear AERA Members and Past Annual Meeting Attendees,
 
I am writing to encourage you to participate in the 2016 AERA Annual Meeting. In AERA's Centennial Year, the Annual Meeting will be held Friday, April 8 – Tuesday, April 12 in Washington, DC. Jeannie Oakes, AERA President, Kevin G. Welner, Annual Meeting Program Chair, Michelle Renee, Annual Meeting Program Vice Chair, and the 2016 Program Committee, are pleased to announce this year’s Annual Meeting Theme: “Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies”. Now is the time to advance a paper or session submission for consideration by a division, special interest group, or committee and to volunteer as a chair or discussant.
 
Deadline for Paper and Session Submissions is July 22
Please review the Call for Submissions as it contains important information about this year’s Annual Meeting theme and submission requirements. Please log in to advance a paper or session submission. After you login, click ‘My AERA’ at the top of the page. On the ‘My AERA’ page, scroll down to the 2016 Annual Meeting and click ‘Online Program Portal’.
 
Please pay special attention to the six elements that must be addressed in the narrative paper submissions even if the results, conclusions, or findings are not complete or final at the time of the submission. Also, please indicate your preferred type of session and willingness to present in alternative formats at the time of submission.
 
The Professional Development Call for Proposals is also open. 
 
Volunteer to Serve as a Chair or Discussant by August 28
Please review the Call for Volunteer Session Chairs and Discussants and consider volunteering. Please log in to volunteer as a chair or discussant. The quality of the AERA Annual Meeting depends on education researchers with appropriate expertise who serve as chairs and discussants for paper sessions and roundtables.
 
Please contact the Meetings Team at annualmtg@aera.net or (202) 238-3200 with any questions and I look forward to your participation in an enriching 2016 Annual Meeting.
 
Kind regards,
 
Laurie Cipriano, CMP
Director of Meetings

 

Call for Proposals for Individual Presentations, Coordinated Sessions, and Training Sessions

Annual Meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education

Call for Proposals  - Deadline: August 1, 2015

 

The National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) invites you to submit a proposal for presentations and sessions at its Annual Meeting, April 7-11, 2016 in Washington, DC. NCME will accept the submission of proposals through Saturday, August 1 at 11:59 PM PDT.

 

Please review the full NCME Call for Proposals prior to submitting your proposal.

CONFERENCE THEME

The theme of the 2016 Annual Meeting is Foundations and Frontiers:  Advancing Educational Measurement for Research, Policy, and Practice.   This theme acknowledges the variety of stakeholders that use educational assessments, including educators, policy makers, and researchers. Stakeholder uses of educational assessments are diversifying and expanding with the advent of new measurement methods and new methods of data collection. In this shifting environment, innovation is necessary, yet foundational principles of measurement, especially the concepts of validity and reliability, have never been more important. In recognition of both measurement foundations and measurement frontiers, the program committee seeks a broad range of proposals, in particular those that concern:

·         Relevant approaches for improving the reliability of assessment scores and the

                   validity of their uses.

·         Novel methods of data collection and analysis.

·         The measurement and relevance of novel constructs related to education.

·         Novel applications and uses of educational assessment data. 

·         Understanding of problems posed by recent and future uses of test scores.

·         Solutions to these problems.

 On behalf of NCME, we are looking forward to the 78th Annual Meeting. With your help, we expect to have engaging, interactive, and stimulating sessions.

Be sure to submit your research and volunteer as a discussant and session chair for the Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, in 2016.

Andrew Ho and Matthew Johnson, Co-chairs, Annual Meeting Program Committee

Xin Li, Chair, Training and Professional Development

 

ProgramChairs@ncme.org

 

 
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