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2019 Pre-Conference Seminars
 
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2019 Division B Pre-Conference Seminars

 

Greetings Good People of Division B,

We are excited to announce the 2019 AERA Division B: Curriculum Studies Annual Pre-Conference Seminars, which will be held for two days on April 4 (12-5pm, followed by a dinner) and April 5 (9-12pm) in Toronto. The Division B Pre-Conference Seminars are an important tradition within the AERA annual meeting structure. It is an opportunity for emerging scholars, early career scholars, and senior scholars to participate in dynamic mentorship, where we share wisdom, creative ideas, and encouragement.This year’s seminars represent a reorientation of research towards healing, disruptions, diversity and creativity, across multiple contexts and possibilities. This year, year we are offering the following five seminars. Click on each seminar title listed below to see a full description, facilitators' biographies, and submission information.

Making Revolution Irresistible: The Politics and Poetics of Writing/Reading as an Act of Social Justice
Denise Taliaferro Baszile, Ph.D.
Cheryl Matias, Ph.D.

Early Career Curriculum Scholar Seminar: Thriving Courageously and Creatively in the Contested Landscape of Education 
Theodorea R. Berry, Ph.D.
Robert Helfenbein, Ph.D.

International Curriculum Research Graduate Student Seminar
Ming Fang He, Ph.D.
Dinny Risri Aletheiani, Ph.D.
Min Yu, Ph.D.

(Re)engaging with the Intersections of Disability and Curriculum: Moving Towards a Culture of Anti-ableist, Intersectional, and Interdependence Praxis 
Holly Pearson, Ph.D.
David Hernández-Saca, Ph.D.

Laboring for Love, Toward Justice, With Joy: Wellness Work for Curriculum Scholars in the Wake of “45”
Crystal Laura, Ph.D.
Marcelle Haddix, Ph.D.

We invite you to publicize these as widely as possible, encouraging students and junior faculty to become members of Division B and apply by the deadline: February 15, 2019 (11:59pm EST). Scroll down for application instructions.

Looking Forward,
Denise Taliaferro Baszile
Division B VP


How to Apply

Send one file containing the following application materials via email (subject line: Div B Pre-Conference: Last name.First name) to the lead facilitator listed on the official call.

  1. Full contact information including name, Department, University, and program you are in, e.g., Master’s or Ph.D. and the sub-area of your Department if applicable, your mailing address with zip or post code, best telephone number, and email address;
  2. A maximum one-page, single-spaced description of how your research relates to the seminar theme and description;
  3. Updated curriculum vitae

Making Revolution Irresistible: The Politics and Poetics of Writing/Reading as an Act of Social Justice

Facilitators
Denise Taliaferro Baszile, Ph.D.
Cheryl Matias, Ph.D.

Native American activist Russell Means opened his most famous speech—“For America to Live Europe Must Die”—with the following protest:

The only possible opening for a statement of this kind is that I detest writing. The process itself epitomizes the European concept of “legitimate” thinking; what is written has an importance denied the spoken. It is one of the White world’s ways of destroying the cultures of non-European peoples, the imposing of abstraction over the spoken relationship of a people.

Means’ protest against writing is his protest against the ways in which European cultural thought and behavior have worked to define “legitimate” writing/thinking as that which objectifies and neutralizes, that which represents the superiority of the Rational mind over the emotional body, that which is the conflation of reason with whiteness, that which is despiritualized, that which under girds legal rationality, scientific rationality, techno-rationality, that which has—despite its triumphs—often worked to hinder democracy and maintain white supremacy.

In Literacy and Racial Justice, Catherine Prendergast makes a similar argument, but extends it to encompass the ideology of literacy—or the use of reading and writing to protect the privilege of some and to deny it to others. Looking both historically and into the present moment, Prendergast argues quite convincingly that, literacy has been and continues to be understood primarily as white property used to maintain “White” identity and the conception of America as a White nation under the guise of progress and justice for all.

Means’ protest and Prendergast’s argument help us to understand the ways in which dominant power gets exercised epistemologically--framing if we know, how we know, what we know and how we can “legitimately” express what we know. In short, literacy is the Master’s tool. And yet those of us who have chosen to work for justice from the space of academia have given up the possibility of protesting the abuse and misuse of literacy by refusing to write. Our responsibility instead is precisely to write; it is to write revolution; it is to write as if the tools no longer without question belong to the/a any master. As such, we must contemplate how to open up spaces to not only pursue social justice in the content of our writing/reading but also through the very act of writing/reading.

Writing/reading as an act of social justice is summed up in the sentiment that poet June Jordan expressed when she noted that her job as a poet was to make revolution irresistible, that is to call people to the collective work of social justice. In what ways have written texts contributed to socially just change?  Is it possible to write/read poetically given the politics of academic publishing? What are some strategies for writing in a way that not only informs but inspires? What are some of the challenges involved in writing/reading for social justice? What are some creative responses to those challenges?  This preconference seminar will offer insight, examples and strategies for how young scholars might engage writing/reading as an act of social justice while keeping sight of the politics that govern academic publishing.  In this workshop participants will:

  • Reflect on the role writing/reading have played in calling people to collective action for social justice.
  • Contemplate the insights offered by inspiring and inspired writers/readers in the field of curriculum studies.
  • Work with 2-3 strategies designed to help academic writers/readers approach their work creatively
  • Apply at least one strategy to a working paper or a reading task
  • Identify the challenges of engaged writing/reading in/through/against academia
  • Develop a list of strategies for navigating the politics of academic publishing and finding the best place for one’s engaged writing

Facilitator Bios

Denise Taliaferro Baszile (taliafda@miamioh.edu) is Associate Dean of Diversity and Student Experience and Associate Professor of Curriculum & Cultural Studies in the Department of Educational Leadership at Miami University. Her work focuses on understanding curriculum as racial/gendered text with an emphasis on disrupting traditional modes of knowledge production, validation and representation. Her scholarship draws on curriculum theory, critical race theory, and Black feminist theory and seeks a fuller understanding rather than a simply a legitimate understanding of the dynamic relationship between race, gender and curriculum. She has published in various journals including Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, Curriculum and Pedagogy, Educational Foundations, Race Ethnicity and Education, Urban Education, Qualitative Inquiry and Knowledge Cultures. She has also published several book chapters in key texts, such as Education and Epistemologies of Ignorance, Curriculum Studies the Next Moment, and the Guide to Curriculum in Education. co-edited two books, one entitled Womanish Ways: Renderings at the Intersections of Race, Gender and Curriculum Studies and the other is Black Women Theorizing Curriculum in Colour and Curves. Dr. Baszile has served in numerous leadership roles including President of American Educational Studies Association (2016), Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory Leadership Team (2007-2009), and she is currently the VP for Division B (2017-2020). Dr. Baszile is also the co-founder of the Currere Exchange conference and journal. 

Cheryl E. Matias is an Associate Professor in the School of Education & Human Development (SEHD) at the University of Colorado Denver. Her research focuses on race and ethnic studies in education with a theoretical focus on critical race theory, critical whiteness studies, critical pedagogy and feminism of color.  Specifically, she uses a feminist of color approach to deconstruct the emotionality of whiteness in urban teacher education and how it impacts urban education.  Her other research interest is on motherscholarship and supporting woman of color and motherscholars in the academy. A former K-12 teacher in both South Central, Los Angeles Unified School District and Bed-Stuyvesant, New York City Department of Education, she earned her bachelors in cultural communication from University of California San Diego, teaching credential at San Diego State University, and her masters in Social and Multicultural Foundations at California State University, Long Beach. She earned her doctorate at UCLA with an emphasis in race and ethnic studies in education. She has delivered talks at the University of Washington, Seattle, University of New Mexico, Teachers College Columbia University, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, University of Colorado, Boulder, Michigan State, University of Oregon, and many more.  She recently was awarded the 2014 American Educational Research Association’s Division K (Teacher Education) Innovations in Research on Diversity in Teacher Education Award and the 2014 Colorado Rosa Parks Diversity Award.  In 2015, she was awarded Researcher of the Year by the School of Education & Human Development at University of Colorado Denver. In 2016 she was nominated by doctoral students and was awarded the university’s 2016 Graduate School’s Dean Mentoring Award. Some of her publications can be found in Race, Ethnicity, and Education, Teacher Education Quarterly, Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis, Equity and Excellence, Journal of Teacher Education and Multicultural Perspectives.  Recently, she finished her first solo-authored book entitled Feeling White: Whiteness, Emotionality, and Education which just earned the 2017 Honorable Mention for the Society of Professors of Education and will be awarded at 2017 AERA. She is a motherscholar of three, including boy-girl twins, an avid Lakers fan, and Bachata ballroom dancer.

Send applications to Denise Taliaferro Baszile (taliafda@miamioh.edu). 


Early Career Scholar Seminar: Thriving Courageously and Creatively in the Contested Landscape of Education

Facilitators
Theodorea R. Berry, Ph.D.
Robert J. Helfenbein, Ph.D.

This seminar has been designed for early career scholars to meet the challenges of the first years out of graduate school. These challenges include developing a program of research and a writing discipline, finding outlets (academic and popular) for publications, possibly beginning a new faculty position, earning tenure or contract renewal, seeking internal and external research funding, and thriving in your teaching as well as in your community engagements and activism. In addition, new faculty members must navigate the idiosyncrasies of institutions with a wide range of social and cultural contexts, including patterns of injustice, privilege, and power. This seminar is designed to support and mentor early career folks through the forest and the trees by gathering with scholar-mentors from Division B in order to focus on various topics related to research and scholarship, teaching, activism, and community engagement. Topics to be discussed at the seminar will emerge from participants, and will likely include: developing worthwhile goals and research agendas; recognizing and positioning one’s inquiries within traditions in the field of curriculum studies and seeking creative ways to move beyond those traditions; navigating creatively, courageously, and wisely in one’s university and the larger communities; and developing strategies to thrive as a teacher and a scholar whose efforts can have a powerful positive impact in this contested and troubling world. In this seminar participants will:

  • Reflect on the meanings of teaching, research and scholarship, activism, and community engagement in the context of curriculum studies
  • Identify the challenges of teaching, research and scholarship, activism, and community engagement in curriculum studies
  • Address a list of strategies toward working as a curriculum scholar in traditional academic spaces
  • Engage in presentations of research as a way of addressing venues for academic publishing in curriculum studies

Facilitator Bios

Theodorea Regina Berry (theodorea.berry@sjsu.edu) is Professor and Chair in the  Department of African American Studies and also Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership at San José State University. Dr. Berry’s scholarship focuses on the lived experiences of women of color as pre-service teachers and teacher educators, critical examination of race, ethnicity, and gender for teaching and teacher education, critical race theory/critical race feminism, qualitative research methodology (with a focus on narrative inquiry, ethnography, and auto-ethnography), and curriculum theory. She has published a wide array of articles and book chapters and is lead editor and contributing author of From Oppression to Grace: Women of Color and their Dilemmas Within the Academy (2006, Stylus Publishing). She is also co-editor of The Evolving Significance of Race in Education: Living, Learning, and Teaching (with Sherick Hughes, Peter Lang). She is also author of States of Grace: Counterstories of a Black Woman in the Academy (2018, Peter Lang) and lead editor of Latinx Curriculum Theorizing (with Crystal Kalinec-Craig and Maríela A. Rodriguez, forthcoming, Lexington Books). Dr. Berry is Senior Co-Editor for the International Journal of Curriculum and Social Justice, Associate Editor for Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, and Editorial Board Member for Race, Ethnicity, and Education. Dr. Berry is currently the AERA Division B Secretary.

Robert J. Helfenbein (rjhelfenbein@loyola.edu) is the Associate Dean of the School of Education at Loyola University Maryland. Dr. Helfenbein has published and edited numerous research articles and book chapters about contemporary education analysis in. urban contexts in journals such as Curriculum Inquiry, the Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, Educational Studies, The Urban Review, the Review of Education, Pedagogy and Cultural Studies, and co-edited the Unsettling Beliefs: Teaching Theory to Teachers (2008), Ethics and International Curriculum Work: The Challenges of Culture and Context (2012), and Deterritorializing/ Reterritorializing: Critical Geographies of Education Reform (2017). In 2008, Dr. Helfenbein served as the Section Chair for Critical Perspectives and Practices of AERA Division B-Curriculum Studies followed by serving as overall Program Chair in 2009 and was inducted into Professors of Curriculum in 2011. He has been Editor for Journal of Curriculum Theorizing and organizer of the Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice from 2012-2018. His current research interests include curriculum theorizing in urban contexts, the politics of policing, cultural studies of education, and the impact of globalization on the lived experience of schools.

Send applications to Theodorea Berry (theodorea.berry@sjsu.edu).


International Curriculum Research Graduate Student Seminar

Facilitators
Ming Fang He, Ph.D.
Dinny Risri Aletheiani, Ph.D.
Min Yu, Ph.D.

The International Curriculum Research Graduate Student Seminar seeks to create a research community for graduate students who are interested in international/comparative curriculum studies that focus on the complexities and contradictions of curriculum theory and research in relation to race, ethnicity, class, and gender issues in international/transnational contexts. The major purpose of this seminar is to share the characteristics and examples of emergent international/comparative curriculum inquiries that explore the life of diverse schools, families, and communities with the intent to foster equity, equality, and social justice in international and transnational contexts. This seminar draws upon and move beyond a wide array of international/comparative curriculum inquiry traditions such as critical race narrative inquiry, critical geography/critical dis/ability studies, critical multiracial/mixed racial narrative inquiry,  auto/biographical inquiry, multiperspectival poetic inquiry, critical ethnography, oral history research, multiperspectival cultural studies, womanist currere, critical portraiture, memoir, fiction, oral history, documentary film, and painting. Facilitators and participants will share their innovations in inquiry and writing through autobiographical writings, poetry, story, oral histories, critical portraiture, memoir, fiction, documentary novel, reader’s theatre, spoken word, drama, singing, rapping, dancing, painting, digital story telling, graphic novels, multimedia representations, and documentary film which reflect the life they and their participants live in-between contested race, gender, class, and power in the U.S. and around the world.

The facilitators will work with seminar participants in seeking ways to negotiate, question, and advance disruptive and emergent theories, methodologies, and epistemologies within local, national, international, and transnational spaces. Together, facilitators and participants will explore creative ways to engage in international/comparative curriculum inquiry; transcend epistemological, methodological, and representational boundaries; and research silenced narratives of underrepresented or disenfranchised individuals and groups with hearts and minds. They will discuss how diverse forms of international/comparative curriculum inquiry and modes of representation and expression help address pressing issues and contemporary concerns; make impact on practice, policy, and historical, social, political, economic, geographical, cultural, linguistic, and ecological contexts; and advance international/comparative curriculum theorizing toward social justice. Contributions, potentials, challenges, and future directions of international/comparative curriculum studies are also explored. Doctoral students who are interested in human rights and social justice issues are strongly encouraged to apply.

Facilitator Bios

Ming Fang He (mfhe@georgiasouthern.edu) is Professor of Curriculum Studies at Georgia Southern University. She has been teaching at the graduate, pre-service, and in-service levels in the United States, Canada, Hong Kong, and China. She explores education, inquiry, and life in-between the Eastern, Western, and exile philosophy and curriculum. She has written about cross-cultural narrative inquiry of language, culture, and identity in multicultural contexts, cross-cultural teacher education, curriculum studies, activist practitioner inquiry, social justice research, exile curriculum, narrative of curriculum in the U. S. South, and transnational and diasporic studies. Her books include: A River Forever Flowing: Cross-Cultural Lives and Identities in the Multicultural Landscape (2003); Narrative and Experience in Multicultural Education (with Michael Connelly & JoAnn Phillion, 2005); Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction (with Michael Connelly & JoAnn Phillion, 2008); Personal~Passionate~Participatory Inquiry into Social Justice in Education (with JoAnn Phillion, 2008); Handbook of Asian Education [with Yong Zhao (Editor), Jing Lei, Goufang Li, Kaori Okano, Nagwa Megahed, David Gamage, & Hema Ramanathan (Co-Editors), 2011]; Sage Guide to Curriculum in Education (with Brian Schultz & William Schubert, 2015); and Oxford Encyclopedia of Curriculum Studies (Editors-in-Chief with William Schubert; with Associate Editors: Isabel Nuñez, Patrick Roberts, Sabrina Ross, & Brian D. Schultz. In G. W. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford Research Encyclopedias of Education. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press). She co-edits two book series with Information Age Publishing: Research for Social Justice: Personal~Passionate~Participatory Inquiry (with JoAnn Phillion) and Landscapes of Education (with William Schubert). She guest edited an issue of Critical Inquiry into Curriculum and Instruction on Experiential Approaches in Curriculum Studies: Personal, Passionate, and Participatory Inquiries (with JoAnn Phillion, 2001); a special issue of Journal of Curriculum Theorizing on Narrative of Curriculum in the U. S. South: Lives In-Between Contested Race, Gender, Class, and Power (with Sabrina Ross, 2013); and a special issue of The Sophist’s Bane: A Journal of the Society of Professors of Education on Minority Women Professors Venturing on the Landscapes of Education (with Sabrina Ross, 2015). She was an Editor of Curriculum Inquiry (2003-2005) and is a Leading Associate Editor of Multicultural Perspectives (since 2003) and a member of International Editorial Board of Curriculum Inquiry (since 2015). She was the Vice President of the AERA Division B (2014-2017). Her current research is expanded to the education of ethnic minority and disenfranchised individuals, groups, tribes, and societies and immigrant education in the United States, Canada, Hong Kong, Mainland China, and other international contexts.

Dinny Risri Aletheiani (dinny.aletheiani@yale.edu) is a faculty member at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, Yale University. She holds a Ph.D in Curriculum Studies from Arizona State University. She has taught courses on schooling and culture, multicultural education, curriculum theory and practices, alternative education and free schools, linguistics, education and policy in Indonesia and in Southeast Asia, and research and creative projects on Indonesia. She has been working closely with and advising both undergraduate and graduate students on their research projects from politics of education, and critical history and de/colonization to Southeast Asia studies, policies, environment and indigenous communities, global health, religion and politics, and issues of globalization with interdisciplinary approaches. She is currently working with curriculum studies scholars from US, Jamaica, South Korea, Japan, and Portugal, sharing research and translation projects on the works of international curriculum theorists under the American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies (AAACS) Internationalization of Curriculum Studies Task Force. She in particular has been writing and translating excerpts of curriculum works written in late 1800 and early and mid 1900 by Ki Hadjar Dewantara, an Indonesian curriculum theorist (Aletheiani, 2016). She was awarded a Fulbright scholarship at Arizona State University. She is the elected secretary of the American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies; has also served AAACS as the technology committee and webmaster since 2012; and co-editor of AERA Division B (Curriculum Studies) Newsletter. She also serves as a faculty advisor to the Yale Indonesia Forum (YIF). Combining her research on curriculum history, oral history, technology and art-based approaches, she is currently working on the Sound Storytelling Project on Southeast Asia. She has been also a dance instructor and has organized workshops and performed internationally. Her recent theater and dance performances and choreography are on the documentary theater titled Islands: The Lost History of the Treaty that Changed the World (2017) broadcasted by NPR, RRI, and featured by BBC Radio.

Min Yu (minyu@wayne.edu) is Assistant Professor in the College of Education at Wayne State University. Her work situates within the fields of curriculum studies and comparative and international education. Her main research focuses on how changing social and political conditions affect the education of children from migrant and immigrant families and communities. Her ongoing line of inquiry explores the relationships between home, school, and community with attention to historical and contemporary contexts of transnational migration. Her work appears in the Journals of Teachers College Record; Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education; Educational Action Research; Review of Research in Education; The China Quarterly; and Comparative Education Review, as well as chapters in various edited volumes. She is the author of the book The Politics, Practices, and Possibilities of Migrant Children Schools in Contemporary China (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016). She plays a leading role in developing an international research community among graduate students through AERA’s Graduate Student Council and among junior faculty members through Division B, Critical Issues in Curriculum and Cultural Studies SIG, International Studies SIG, and other Divisions and SIGs. She has been invited to serve as a Section Program Co-Chair (2014-2016), Communication Officer (2016-2017), and as a member of Nomination Committee (2016), Outstanding Dissertation Award Committee (2016-2017), Outstanding Book Award Committee (2018-2019) for Division B.

Send applications to Ming Fang He (mfhe@georgiasouthern.edu).


(Re)engaging with the Intersections of Disabilty and Curriculum: Moving Towards a Culture of Anti-ableist, Intersectional, and Interdependence Praxis

Facilitators
Holly Pearson, Ph.D.
David Hernández-Saca, Ph.D.

This session is designated to bring together educational researchers to examine historical and current educational challenges of the intersections of disability and curriculum. Emerging and seasoned scholars who are well versed with Disability Studies (DS), Disability Studies in Education (DSE), disability justice, inclusion, and accessibility are organizing this pre-conference. The overall aim of this session is to structure space(s) for participants to collectively reflect and examine (1) the historical and current challenges of curriculum design in particular with academics with disabilities (including students) in higher education, (2) the current research and practices related to this pressing topic, and (3) implications for future research and engagement through networking and collaboration on increasing equitable educational opportunities in higher education for academics (including students) with disabilities. The target audience includes graduate students, emerging scholars and established scholars who are invested in collaboratively transforming the higher education curricular culture towards an anti-ableist, intersectional, equitable, and inclusive environment and system. From an interdisciplinary standpoint, participants will explore historical and contemporary educational research that addresses disability at its intersections and their considerations in moving towards implementing disability pedagogy and praxis across higher education for individual and societal change. 

Facilitator Bios

Holly Pearson is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Framingham State University. Her research focuses on intersectionality and institutional diversity in higher education, in particular with the disconnect between diversity and disability from a critical spatial and architectural lens. She is interested in the dynamics of space(s) and identities as a means of critically re-thinking institutional diversity. Presently, she is exploring the history of higher education, particularly in the dynamic between higher education architecture and diversity. She is also examining disability disclosure, hidden labor, and hidden curriculum among scholars with disabilities. She has published research on impact of disability studies curriculum, disability and diversity, disability and spaces, intersectionality, and arts-based and visual methodologies.

David Hernández-Saca is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Northern Iowa. Dr. Hernández-Saca's research nucleus of his research agenda is problematizing the common sense assumptions of learning disabilities (LD). Dr. Hernández-Saca’s three lines of research include: (1) the emotional impact of LD labeling on conceptions of self, (2) the role of emotion and affect in teacher learning about social justice issues, and (3) transition plans and programming for historically marginalized youth with disabilities at their intersections of multiple identities and their families. Overall, Dr. Hernández-Saca investigates these lines of inquiry as they relate to historical equity issues in general education and special education and current movements for inclusive education.

Send applications to Holly Pearson (hpearson@framingham.edu).


Laboring for Love, Toward Justice, with Joy: Wellness Work for Curriculum Scholars in the Wake of "45"

Facilitators
Crystal Laura, Ph.D.
Marcelle Haddix, Ph.D.

To be alive and well in the current era of fascism, racism, and the 45th presidency, it seems to us—two Black|female|mother|critical|scholars—that curricula of healing is absolutely essential. Having personally experienced the heaviness of the political moment and engaged in casual and more formal conversations among justice-oriented comrades in the field, we know that healing, especially through the work of radical self-care and wellness, are deemed important to many other educational scholars and the production and dissemination of their scholarship, too. Yet, we ask you—dear colleague—as Toni Cade Bambara did in her seminal novel The Salt Eaters (1980): “Are you sure, sweetheart, that you want to be well? Just so’s you’re sure, sweetheart, and ready to be healed, cause wholeness is no trifling matter. A lot of weight when you’re well.” Wellness—or the achievement of a balanced life through consistent attention to our occupational, intellectual, spiritual, social, physical, and emotional state—requires that you take seriously, among other components, love.

Academics have a hard time talking about the role of “love” in social research and in the lives of researchers themselves, and the lack of a working definition for its meaning only partly explains our difficulty. The more substantial barrier is our tendency to think about “research” not as a careful exploration of specific social, intellectual, or methodological problems that bear on the everyday circumstances of real people, but as the product of observable and replicable processes, of science. Love, many would argue, has nothing to do with this. We beg to differ. As we understand it, love—the material and conceptual pursuit of our own or someone else’s humanity—is as sorely needed in the field of education as it is in New York City streets. Together with seminar participants, we will openly explore what it means for educational researchers to do their work from a place of love. Drawing upon themes introduced in Black feminist bell hooks’ book, All About Love (2000), each day of this pre-conference seminar will include seven components:

intention-setting; visualization; breath work; discussion; creative writing; meditation; and movement. Participants should have a journal and a pen; come dressed comfortably; and bring a blanket or yoga mat. The immediate goal of the seminar is to help participants center and ground in a bustling city before a busy conference. The greater goal is to teach and learn concrete strategies of a healing curriculum that can be practiced daily within and beyond academic spaces.

Facilitator Bios

Crystal T. Laura is Associate Professor of Educational Leadership and Co-Director of the Center for Urban Research and Education at Chicago State University (CSU). Crystal’s work has focused on the social foundations of education, diversity and equity in schools, and building the capacity of school-based educational leaders to promote social justice. Crystal’s scholarship on the “school-to-prison pipeline” is informed by her dissertation project, for which she won an Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Qualitative Research Special Interest Group of AERA and has appeared in Race, Ethnicity and Education, Cultural Studies-Critical Methodologies, Gender and Education, Critical Questions in Education, and also in her award-winning book, Being Bad: My Baby Brother and the School-to-Prison Pipeline. She currently serving as Chair of the Equity and Inclusion Council. Crystal is a practicing vegan and 200-hour registered yoga instructor who specializes in yoga for mothers of color. She is also a member of the Yoga for Black Lives collective of teachers who lead pop-up yoga classes to generate donations in support of Black-affirming activism in Chicago.

Marcelle Haddix is a Dean’s Associate Professor and chair of the Reading and Language Arts department in the Syracuse University School of Education and a nationally-recognized literacy scholar committed to centering Black literacies in educational practices and spaces. She directs two literacy programs for adolescent youth: the Writing Our Lives project that supports the writing practices of urban middle and high school students within and beyond school contexts, and the Dark Girls afterschool program for Black middle school girls aimed at celebrating Black girl literacies. Marcelle’s work is featured in Research in the Teaching of English, English Education, Linguistics and Education, and Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy and in her book, Cultivating Racial and Linguistic Diversity in Literacy Teacher Education. For Marcelle, yoga, wellness, and healthy living are deeply personal and political. Known as The ZenG, she is a practicing vegan and 200-hour registered yoga instructor who specializes in yoga for underrepresented groups and for community-based organizations.

Send applications to Crystal T. Laura (claura@csu.edu).

 
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