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News Releases and Statements
 
2020
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March

 

AERA Announces Cancellation of 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting 
AERA announced today that it is cancelling plans for a virtual 2020 Annual Meeting in April. Read more

AERA Announces 2020 Annual Meeting Change Due to Coronavirus
AERA will not be holding a place-based Annual Meeting in San Francisco, CA, in April 2020 due to the coronavirus. Instead, AERA is shifting to a virtual meeting. Read more

Study: Social Studies Teachers Not “Above the Fray” in Linking Their Political Views to How They Assess News Source Credibility
A new study published in Educational Researcher finds a strong connection between high school social studies teachers’ political ideology and how credible they find various mainstream news outlets. Read more

February
 

Na'ilah Suad Nasir Voted AERA President-Elect; Key Members Elected to AERA Council
Na'ilah Suad Nasir, president of the Spencer Foundation, has been voted president-elect of AERA. Along with Nasir as president-elect, members elected several new AERA Council representatives.  Read more

AERA Announces 2020 Fellows
AERA has announced the selection of 12 prominent scholars as 2020 AERA Fellows. AERA Fellows are selected on the basis of their notable and sustained research achievements. They join 665 current AERA Fellows. Read more

January


NSF Selects AERA and ICPSR to Create New Data Hub to Boost STEM Education Research Efforts
AERA and ICPSR have joined forces to create a research data hub to connect, educate, and build a community around STEM education data resources. This new platform—Partnership for Expanding Education Research in STEM (PEERS)—was competitively selected for support by the NSF through its Core Research Program in the Directorate of Education and Human Resources. Read more

Research Finds that High School GPAs Are Stronger Predictors of College Graduation than ACT Scores
Students’ high school grade point averages are five times stronger than their ACT scores at predicting college graduation, according to a new study published in Educational Researcher. Read more

 
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