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NIH Funding Opportunities Available for Research on Education and Health Linkages
 
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January 2016

On January 12, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) posted three Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) regarding grants for researchers to explore linkages between education and health.

These opportunities build upon 13 previous research grants that NIH funded in 2003. While the previous grants advanced research in better understanding connections between education and health, the work also raised further questions. In 2014, NIH’s Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) held a workshop (in which AERA Executive Director Felice Levine participated) that encouraged further exploration of these issues. The workshop also recommended developing measures of outcomes and investing in longitudinal studies to understand the long-term effects of health and education interventions across the lifespan.

NIH is considering funding some of the following topics:

  • What is the effect(s) of education on the function or structure of the brain (e.g., prefrontal cortex, temporal lobe, etc.) during the period of formal education; is there the evidence of the persistence of these alterations into adulthood?
  • What is the effect of education and moderating factors such as peer/group effects and/or social context formation provided by the school on the development of health behaviors?
  • Are the behavioral, psychological, and neurobiological risk factors associated with poor early educational experiences plastic or malleable in mid-life? Can we identify targets for intervention in mid-late life that might compensate for or remediate deficits associated with these risk factors?

The following links provide further information on the three FOAs:

The deadline for the Research Project Grant (R01) is June 5. The deadline for applications for the Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant (R21) and Small Grant Program (R03) opportunities is June 16.

 
 
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