2013 Professional Development and Training Courses
2013 Professional Development and Training Courses
 
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AERA Announces Professional Development and
Training Courses for 2013 Annual Meeting

Courses Start April 26

                The Professional Development and Training Committee has planned a rich program of extended and mini-courses for the 2013 AERA Annual Meeting in San Francisco. The program was crafted based on consideration of more than 50 submissions and a competitive review process. Professional development courses provide training in specific research methods and skills, cover significant research issues in related disciplines, emphasize specialized areas, address professional development issues, focus on research for the improvement of practice, or examine recent methodological and substantive developments in education research.

                The extended courses begin on Friday, April 26, one day before the start of the Annual Meeting. The mini-courses will be held Sunday through Tuesday, April 28–30. For further information on these courses, see the AERA website: http://www.aera.net. Direct questions about the professional development and training courses to profdevel@aera.net.

 

Extended Courses

PDC01: An Introduction to Hierarchical Linear Modeling for Educational Researchers

Instructors:         D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut; Ann A. O’Connell, The Ohio State University

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $115

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Grand Ballroom West       

This course will introduce hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), focusing on fundamental concepts and practical applications, with minimal emphasis on statistical theory. In addition to presenting a conceptual overview of HLM, the instructors will utilize a school-based example to demonstrate the application of HLM within an organizational framework.  Participants will learn how to analyze 2-level data using HLM 7 and to interpret the results of the analyses. Instruction will consist of lecture, demonstrations of the software, and hands-on data analysis opportunities.  Participants should bring a laptop equipped with the free student version of HLM (from http://www.ssicentral.com) and SPSS (or other data manipulation software). The course example data will run on the student version of HLM. (Please note: there is no MAC version of HLM.)

 

PDC02: Educational Neuroscience: Methods and Applications

Instructors:         Stephen R. Campbell, Simon Fraser University; David Wheeler, Simon Fraser University

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $115

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Curran       

This course will introduce participants to methods, applications, and related initiatives and issues pertaining to educational neuroscience, such as outreach and neuroethics. Methods include acquisition tools ranging from electroencephalography (EEG), eye-tracking (ET), to audiovisual, screen and keyboard capture, data analysis techniques for processing EEG and ET data, as well as ways for integrating, synchronizing, and interpreting such diverse data sets. Applications include qualitative and quantitative research in mathematics education and educational psychology. This course is geared towards early career and senior educational researchers and administrators potentially seeking to incorporate similar approaches and/or facilities within their own research and institutions.

 

PDC03: Empowerment Evaluation: Using Evaluation to Improve Program Performance and Cultivate Organizational Learning

Instructors:         David Fetterman, Fetterman & Associates

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Sequoia  

Empowerment evaluation is designed to help researchers use evaluation to accomplish their objectives. It is instrumental in the development of new programs, ongoing self-assessment, organizational learning, and accreditation self-studies. The course will include core concepts including critical friend, culture of evidence, community of learners, cycle of reflection and action, and reflective practitioners. Special attention will be paid to principles such as improvement, inclusion, social justice, capacity building, and accountability. Participants will learn how to conduct or monitor an empowerment evaluation. The course format will include presentations, interactive exercises, and dialogue. The course is for evaluators, educators, community organizers, and funders. Participants are encouraged to view empowerment evaluation websites: http://eevaluation.blogspot.com and http://www.davidfetterman.com/empowermentevaluation.htm.

 

PDC04: Learning Mathematics for Teaching: Instrument Dissemination Workshop

Instructors:         Geoffrey Phelps, Educational Testing Service; Heather Hill, Harvard University

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Conference Theatre            

The Learning Mathematics for Teaching (LMT) project develops and disseminates multiple-choice survey measures of mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) for elementary and middle school teachers in the content areas of number concepts and operations, algebra, geometry, rational number, proportional reasoning, and data probability and statistics. This course will provide background information on the development and theory supporting the LMT measures and practical guidance on appropriate use of these measures in research and program evaluation. Instruction will include a demonstration of the online administration system. A basic understanding of statistics is helpful. Individuals interested in attending this course are encouraged to review the information and terms of use on the LMT website before enrolling http://sitemaker.umich.edu/lmt.

 

PDC05: Marginal Mean Weighting through Stratification: A Generalized Method for Causal Inference

Instructors:         Guanglei Hong, University of Chicago; Rachel Garrett, University of Chicago; Yihua Hong, University of Chicago;  Bing Yu, University of Chicago

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Fillmore BC              

The marginal mean weighting through stratification (MMW-S) method is a causal inference strategy suitable for evaluating not only binary treatments but also multiple treatments measured on an ordinal or a nominal scale. It overcomes important limitations of other propensity score based methods. The objective of this course is to equip participants with preliminary knowledge and skills needed for applying the MMW-S method. The course is designed for evaluation researchers and graduate students. Participants will receive related readings, data examples, and SPSS, SAS, STATA, R, and HLM command files for analyzing the data on their laptops. The course will involve instructors’ lecture and demonstration, interspersed with lab sessions in small groups allowing for hands-on practice, trouble shooting, and individual consulting.

 

PDC06: Mixed Data Analysis Techniques: A Comprehensive Step-by-Step Approach

Instructors:         Kathleen M. T. Collins, University of Arkansas; Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Sam Houston State University; Normand Péladeau, Provalis Research

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

                                Saturday, April 27, 8:00 am–4:00 pm

Fee:                       $135

Location:             Hilton Union Square, Ballroom Level - Franciscan CD      

The purpose of this course is to provide a step-by-step guide for selecting and applying quantitative, qualitative, and mixed data-analytic techniques. Designed for graduated students and experienced researchers, this course will provide frameworks and heuristics for selecting and applying data-analytic techniques and validating, interpreting, and reporting results of mixed research studies. The instructors will provide published examples and illustrate applications of statistical software (e.g., SPSS, SAS), qualitative software (e.g., NVIVO), and mixed research software (e.g., QDA Miner) that integrate a variety of text analysis and statistical techniques. The instructors will provide an array of publishing tips and approaches for applying evidenced-based standards and guidelines when reporting results and writing the mixed method research article.

 

PDC07: Narrative Inquiry in Education Research

Instructors:         Colette Daiute, The Graduate Center, City University of New York; Philip Kreniske, Hunter College, City University of New York

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $115

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Grand Ballroom East          

This course offers a practical theory-based approach to narrative inquiry addressing questions of teaching, learning, and development. The course format is a sequence of presentations and hands-on modules, with sections devoted to narrative research design and to narrative analysis. The goals of the course are to define and enact a socio-historical approach to narrative inquiry with several consistent education research design strategies and data analysis tools. A feature of this course is the systematic approach to practice-based research using narratives to mediate interaction and learning across diverse educational contexts. These goals are addressed with examples from prior research and participants’ research projects. Beginning and advanced researchers interested in learning about and applying narrative methods in their research are encouraged to participate.

 

PDC08: Theoretical and Methodological "Speed Dating": Social Theory meets Methodology meets Analysis in Qualitative Research

Instructors:        Sara Childers, University of Alabama; Stephanie Daza, University of Texas Arlington; Mirka Koro-Ljungberg, University of Florida; Becky Atkinson, University of Alabama; Roland Mitchell, Louisiana State University; Lisa Weems, Miami University of Ohio; Alison Happel, University of Memphis; Jeong-eun Rhee, Long Island University; Jerry Roziek, University of Oregon

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Redwood               

This course will explore how qualitative researchers “think with theory” to develop theoretically informed methodological frameworks and design, and to conduct, analyze, and write the results of qualitative studies. Course activities include examining theoretical frameworks and exploring how these frameworks inform participants’ research designs and methodologies. Participants will then apply theory to current and future projects and receive feedback from instructors and peers. Participants will need to bring writing samples. Laptops are recommended, but not required.

 

PDC09: Transnational and Critical Perspectives in Qualitative Literacy Research: Interactive Workshop and Mentoring for Early Career Scholars and Graduate Students

Instructors:         Patricia Enciso, The Ohio State University; Elizabeth Moje, University of Michigan; Gerald Campano, University of Pennsylvania; Faulstich-Orellana, University of California-Los Angeles; Carmen L. Medina, Indiana University; Cynthia Lewis, University of Minnesota; Marcelle Haddix, Syracuse University

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Cypress   

Graduate students and early career scholars will work directly with established literacy researchers on questions and methods that inform qualitative literacy studies in classroom, afterschool, community, and transnational contexts. Participants will examine their own research questions alongside experienced researchers, who will describe the theories and methods that shape their empirical work. Course instructors will lead small group discussions. The course will begin with a framing lecture and conclude with a discussion on the key points and questions raised during the course activities. Participants should be conversant with qualitative approaches to the study of literacy, and bring prepared notes and questions on research in progress.

 

PDC10: Advanced Analysis using International Large Scale Assessment Databases (TIMSS, PIRLS and PISA)

Instructors:         Eugenio Gonzalez, Educational Testing Service; Andres Sandoval-Hernandez, IEA Data Processing and Research Center

Date:                     Friday, April 26, 9:00 am–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Orpheum 

This course covers the statistical complexities and techniques used in the TIMSS, PIRLS and PISA data sets and the implications for basic and advanced statistical analysis. Instructors use a ombination of lectures and hands-on exercises in which participants learn how to prepare the data files for advanced statistical analysis and conduct basic analysis using customized software provided during the workshop.  Participants need to have with them a laptop computer with Windows and SPSS installed, and must have knowledge of basic and intermediate statistics. Data files and demonstration software to use the data will be distributed during the workshop.

 

Mini Courses

PDC11: Introduction to Meta-analysis

Instructors:         Terri Pigott, Loyola University Chicago; Ryan T. Williams, University of Memphis; Joshua Polanin, Loyola University Chicago

Date:                     Sunday, April 28, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $55

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Conference Theatre            

This course will provide an introduction to meta-analysis and focus on the computation of effect sizes, estimating effect size variances, synthesizing effect sizes, creating confidence intervals, and using meta-analysis statistical software. Specific emphasis will be placed on activities pertaining to these procedures, and participants are encouraged to bring questions specific to current projects. Participants will be provided step-by-step instruction using two prominent statistical packages including screen shots of important steps. Graduate students, early career scholars, and advanced researchers are all welcome to attend. The course will assume knowledge of elementary statistics. The course will encourage greater awareness of meta-analysis and participation in this important quantitative technique.

 

PDC12: How to Use NAEP High School Transcript Study Data Tools for Education Research

Instructors:         Janis Brown, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education; Stephen Roey, Westat; Jennifer Laird, MPR Associates, Inc.; Robert Perkins, Westat

Date:                     Sunday, April 28, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Fillmore BC              

This course will provide graduate students, advanced data analysts, and researchers with information on how to access and analyze the High School Transcript Study (HSTS) data that is associated with the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). HSTS analyses and reporting strategies can be modeled for use with State Longitudinal Data Systems (SDLS). Topics covered by this course will include 1) an overview of the HSTS survey design; 2) a demonstration of public-use data tools for accessing and analyzing HSTS data; and 3) tricks and techniques for analyzing large-scale databases. The course will include extensive demonstrations, hands-on exercises for participants, and group discussions. Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop.

 

PDC13: Introduction to the Measures of Effective Teaching Longitudinal Database

Instructors:         Steve Cantrell, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Ronald Ferguson, Harvard University; Ben Kelcey, Wayne State University; Courtney Bell, ETS; Drew Gitomer, Rutgers University; George Alter, University of Michigan; Brian Rowan, University of Michigan; Johanna Bleckman, University of Michigan; Susan M. Jekielek, University of Michigan

Date:                     Sunday, April 28, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Grand Ballroom East

This course will introduce researchers to data collected by the Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) Project. The MET Project is the largest study of classroom teaching ever conducted in the United States.  Supported by a grant from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, MET researchers collected a variety of indicators of teaching quality over a two-year period in the classrooms of more than 2,500 fourth- through ninth-grade teachers working in 317 schools located in six large school districts in the United States. The data collected on teachers and their teaching included: (a) measures of students’ achievement in each teachers‘ classroom drawn from state-administered assessments and supplemental achievement tests; (b) a survey of students in each teacher’s classes; (c) video-recorded lessons taught by a teacher and scored by independent observers using multiple classroom observation protocols; (d) paper and pencil assessments of a teacher’s pedagogical and content knowledge for teaching; and (e) two different teacher surveys. In addition, principals of the schools where teachers worked also completed a survey and other administrative data on schools, teachers, and students are available for analysis. This course will provide an overview of the MET Project, including data collection procedures and types of data collected. Instructors will discuss the opportunities for research with MET data and describe procedures for obtaining access to the MET Longitudinal Database.

 

PDC14: Writing an Application for an IES Grant

Instructors:         Allen Ruby, Institute of Education Sciences; Elizabeth R. Albro, Institute of Education Sciences; Meredith J. Larson, National Center for Education Research

Date:                     Sunday, April 28, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       This course is by application only. AERA must receive the completed application no later than the February 15, 2013 deadline.

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Redwood

This course will provide instruction and advice on writing a successful application to the Institute of Education Sciences’ (IES) Education Research Grants Program (84.305A) and Special Education Research Grants Program (84.324A). The course will focus on: 1) the topics that make up these two grant programs, 2) the goal structure under which these programs operate, and 3) the four sections of the Research Narrative (Significance, Research Plan, Personnel, and Resources) that comprise the most important part of the grant application. Direct instruction on these topics will be accompanied by review of examples, application to participant’s own work, and discussion. Participants are expected to be familiar with the IES Request for Applications (see http://ies.ed.gov/funding/), to have the skills needed for such research, and to bring a research idea and outline of a research plan.

 

PDC15: Propensity Score Matching Using R

Instructors:         Haiyan Bai, University of Central Florida; Wei Pan, Duke University; Christopher Swoboda, University of Cincinnati

Date:                     Sunday, April 28, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Fillmore BC

Through lectures and hands-on activities, this course will introduce basic principles of propensity score matching (PSM) and the use of free R packages for PSM. This course is appropriate for graduate students, faculty members, and applied researchers. Participants will learn why and when we need PSM and how to perform PSM using R packages. Instructions for downloading and installing the free R statistical software and related packages as well as example datasets will be provided to participants in advance through a course website. No prior knowledge of R or PSM is required, but a basic understanding of t-tests and logistic regression is desirable. Participants are encouraged to bring their own PC or Mac laptops for hands-on activities.


PDC16:
Universal Design for Evaluation: How to Increase Involvement of Diverse, Vulnerable, and Hard-to-Reach Populations

Instructors:         June Gothberg, Western Michigan University Jennifer Sulewski, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Date:                     Sunday, April 28, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $55

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Sequoia

Researchers and evaluators are tasked to insure representative samples in their work. Many populations are hard-to-reach and therefore make this task difficult. Designing studies to include all people, especially diverse, vulnerable, and hard-to reach populations, is important to ensure valid results. Universal Design is essential to ensure that these populations are fairly represented and included in the study process. This course will introduce the principles and application of Universal Design and the Universal Design for Evaluation checklist. Participants will add knowledge and skills to increase involvement of diverse, vulnerable, and hard-to-reach populations and given knowledge and tools to improve the design of their own research or evaluation studies.

 

PDC17: Coding Qualitative Data: A Survey of Selected Methods

Instructors:         Johnny Saldaña, Arizona State University

Date:                     Sunday, April 28, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $55

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Conference Theatre

This course will review methods of coding qualitative data, collected from various publications in education and the social sciences. Participants will explore basic coding and recoding principles, apply them to the analysis of qualitative data, and discuss their transfer to relevant future projects. The primary goals of the course are to acquaint participants with sources and methods of coding qualitative data, including factors that influence and affect coding selections, approaches to data analysis, and writing analytic memos. Manual (hard copy) coding will be emphasized with a discussion of available CAQDAS (software) for future use. Target audiences for the course include graduate students in the initial stages of their qualitative research projects, and professors instructing qualitative research methods courses.

 

PDC18: Communicate! Communicate! Getting Your Research Out of a Dark Hole through Social Media, Writing, and Working with Reporters

Instructors:         Barbara McKenna, Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education; Ronald Dietel, University of California-Los Angeles

Date:                     Sunday, April 28, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Redwood

This course is intended for anyone interested in extending the impact and relevance of their research to a wider audience. The hands-on course activities include exercises, presentations, and the development of an action plan. Participants will: 1) engage in sample exercises on effective messaging across all media, 2) review popular social media and strategies for using them effectively, and 3) learn best practices for working successfully with reporters. Participants should bring sample communication materials to share and improve. Laptops are encouraged.

 

PDC19: Using NAEP Data on the Web for Educational Policy Research

Instructors:         Debra Kline, Educational Testing Service; Edward Kulick, Educational Testing Service

Date:                     Monday, April 29, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Fillmore BC

This course is for researchers interested in exploring NAEP data through the NAEP Data Explorer web tool. Participants will be guided through an examination of the data, focusing on 1) student, teacher, and school variables; 2) relationships between student performance and characteristics of students, their teachers and their schools; and 3) using NAEP data to supplement other educational research. Participants will have the opportunity to work independently and share their findings with the group. The course will highlight 2011 NAEP math, reading, science, and writing data. The course provides hands-on learning and active participation. A laptop or tablet computer with a wireless internet card is needed.


PDC20:
International Education Research Made Easier: How to Use Several Free Online Data Tools

Instructors:         David C. Miller, American Institutes for Research; Lydia B. Malley, American Institutes for Research; Laura K. Warren, American Institutes for Research

Date:                     Monday, April 29, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Conference Theatre

This course will cover how to use three newly developed web tools applicable to education research at the national and international level: (1) the Country Reports (CR) tool,; (2) the International Data Explorer (IDE) (see http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/international/ide/); and (3) the International Cross-Time, Cross-System (XTXS) database (see http://intledstatsdatabase.org/default.aspx). These interactive data tools, which are free and publicly available, give researchers, from novice to advanced, the ability to easily view, explore, and manipulate international data. It is recommended that participants bring their own laptops so that they can follow along with the demonstrations and participate in hands-on exercises and practice sessions.

 

PDC21: Designing Adequately Powered Cluster Randomized Trials using Optimal Design Plus

Instructors:         Jessaca Spybrook, Western Michigan University; Carl Westine, Western Michigan University; Joe Taylor, Biological Sciences Curriculum Study; Ben Keleey, Wayne State University

Date:                     Monday, April 29, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Redwood

The purpose of this course is to teach researchers and evaluators how to plan adequately powered cluster randomized trials (CRTs). In addition to providing the rationale and statistical framework for calculating the statistical power, participants will learn how to use the Optimal Design Plus (OD+) software (a free program). Instructors will present the new data repository within OD+. The repository stores design parameters for student level outcomes for reading, math, science, and social/emotional outcomes. Design parameters are also available for teacher level outcomes. The course will combine lecture sessions with hands-on practice. Target audience includes researchers interested in planning and conducting CRTs. Participants should bring a laptop to the course.

 

PDC22: How to Get Published: Guidance from Emerging and Senior Scholars

Instructors:         Patricia A. Alexander, University of Maryland – College Park; Sandra Loughlin, University of Maryland – College Park; Emily Grossnickle, , University of Maryland – College Park; Alexandra List, University of Maryland – College Park; Jeffery A. Greene, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Matthew McCrudden, Victoria, University of Wellington, New Zealand; Panayiota Kendeou, Neapolis University Pafos, Cyprus; Gregory Hancock, University of Maryland – College Park; Diane Schallert, University of Texas, Austin; Sofie Loyens, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands; Patricia B. Elmore, Southern Illinois University

Date:                     Monday, April 29, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $55

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Grand Ballroom East

This course will provide graduate students and early career faculty and researchers with critical information about how to publish. The course will feature two panels: emerging scholars who have learned how to navigate the complex and demanding publication process successfully, and senior scholars who have acquired expertise in foundational aspects of publication. Instructors will present an overview of the publishing process, from conceptualizing studies to preparing well-crafted manuscripts and from submission through review and resubmission. Question and answer sessions will follow both presentations by the emerging scholars and the senior scholars. Each participant will be provided with materials including handouts, work samples, and correspondence that elaborate the important points shared during the session.

 

PDC23: Digital Ethnography: The Affordances and Constraints of Conducting Research that Includes Online Spaces

Instructor:           Sandra Schamroth Abrams, St. John’s University; Hannah R. Gerber, Sam Houston State University; Jayne C. Lammers, University of Rochester

Date:                     Monday, April 29, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Sequoia

This course will help graduate students, early scholars, and advanced researchers explore the role of online spaces in the contemporary collection and triangulation of ethnographic data, considering how digital ethnography informs research of globalization, education, and poverty. Online environments provide opportunities for learners of all socioeconomic backgrounds to inhabit culturally situated environments and access diverse peoples, practices, and knowledge. This course focuses on collecting and analyzing data from digital sources, including videogame-related texts, blogs, fan fiction, social networking sites (SNS), and instant messages. Attendees will engage as digital ethnographers, considering the affordances and constraints of online spaces and how the confluence of sources enriches qualitative data. Participants should have general computer and internet proficiency and will need a laptop for activities.

 

PDC24: Using the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth for Education Research

Instructor:           Elizabeth Cooksey, The Ohio State University

Date:                     Tuesday, April 30, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Grand Ballroom East

This course will introduce new users, and reacquaint past users with the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), the NLSY79 Child and Young Adult, and the NLSY97 data sets.  The instructor will present an overview of the various data sets emphasizing the array of educational data available for each cohort, discuss some recent educational studies that have used these data, and provide hands on experience with accessing data files and downloading variables. The format will be a mixture of lecture and hands on exercises that can be done alone or in small groups.  No prerequisite skills or knowledge is assumed.  The course is open to everyone from graduate students through advanced researchers.  Use of a laptop is desirable.


PDC25:
Introduction to Social Network Analysis for Educational Researchers

Instructor:           Brian V. Carolan, Montclair State University; Alan J. Daly, University of California, San Diego; Nienke M. Moolenaar, University of California, San Diego and University of Twente, The Netherlands

Date:                     Tuesday, April 30, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                       $95

Location:             Grand Hyatt, Theatre Level - Conference Theatre

This course introduces educational researchers to the theory, measures, and applications of social network analysis (SNA). SNA takes as its starting point the principle that social phenomena are created primarily and most importantly by relations and the patterns they form. This principle is especially salient for educational researchers interested in moving beyond individualistic or attribute-based explanations and towards those that bridge theory and empirical reality. Through a combination of lecture and hands-on experience, participants will learn how SNA offers a unique perspective on educational phenomena and the methodological decisions that one must consider when employing its methods and measures. Though intended for beginners, a basic familiarity with applied statistics may be helpful. Participants are encouraged to bring their laptop.

 

PDC26: Cultural Historical Activity Theory Methodologies in the 21st Century: The Intersections of Theory, Research, Policy and Praxis

Instructor:      Carrie Lobman, Rutgers University; Emily Duvall, University of Idaho; Natalia Gajdamaschko, Simon Fraser University; Tatiana Akhutina, Lomonosov Moscow State University; Elena Bodrova, Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning; Michael Cole, University of California, San Diego; Kris Gutiérrez, University of Colorado, Boulder; Lois Holzman, East Side Institute; Ana Marjanovic-Shane, Chestnut Hill College; Jaime Martinez, New York Institute of Technology; Gordon Wells, University of California, Santa Cruz

Date:              Tuesday, April 30, 8:00 am–12:00 pm

Fee:                 $55

Location:         Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Sequoia

This course is designed to support graduate students’ and early and mid-career scholars’ research through the systematic acquisition and interpretation of a significant body of knowledge accumulated by senior scholars who apply Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT). This course emphasizes the application of CHAT theory to the study and development of educational practices across a range of ages and settings, with an emphasis on practices that place cultural tools and learning activity at the center of attempts to understand the relationship of education and poverty. Participants will develop their understanding of a variety of CHAT methodologies including mediated action, development of higher psychological functions, and play and learning activity in the tradition of Vygotsky and those that have further developed his work. The course will provide direct and intensive instruction from experts in the field and establish a network of continuing support for their research. Participants will be partnered with instructors based on the compatibility of their research projects and the expertise of the instructor.

PDC27: How to Analyze Large-Scale Assessments Data from Matrix Booklet Sampling Design: Focus on Psychometrics behind and Hands-on Analysis Using Actual Sample Data 

Instructor:      Emmanuel Sikali, National Center for Education Statistics; Andrew Kolstad, National Center for Education Statistics; Young Yee Kim, American Institutes for Research

Date:               Tuesday, April 30, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

Fee:                  $95

Location:         Grand Hyatt, Conference Theatre

The goal of this course is to provide researchers who are interested in large-scale assessments data from matrix booklet sampling design (e.g. NAEP, TIMSS, PISA, or PIRLS) with the practical knowledge and tools to analyze such data.  This course will provide participants with training on the AM analysis tool as well as the psychometrics behind and sampling design of typical large-scale assessments. AM is a free statistical software package developed for the analysis of large-scale assessment data with complex sampling and the matrix booklet sampling design. Using the publicly-released NAEP mini-sample data, instructors will also provide participants with data analysis strategies, including the marginal maximum likelihood approach to scale score estimation, use of appropriate sampling weights, and appropriate variance estimation.


PDC28:
"Doing" Critical Race Theory in Education

Instructor:       Adrienne D. Dixson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Rema E. Reynolds, University of California, Los Angeles; Laurence Parker, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy, Arizona State University; Carey Hawkins Ash, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Cecilia Suarz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Danielle Parker-Robinson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Cory T. Brown, Murray State University

Date:                Tuesday, April 30, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

Fee:                   $95

Location:         Grand Hyatt, Ballroom Level - Sequoia

This course is designed to engage participants in discussions and activities that focus on Critical Race Theory (CRT) and its use in the larger field of education. Specifically, the primary focus of this course is to engage participants in a series of hands-on activities, writing opportunities, individual exercises, and small-group discussions to deepen their knowledge and understanding of CRT and its use in educational research. This course is appropriate for participants who have a manuscript and/or research proposal in progress that is explicitly focused on race, equity, and access within educational research. Participants should bring with them a laptop, copies of pre-assigned articles, data sets, and other materials they deem helpful to prepare a manuscript or research proposal.

 
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