2022 Annual Meeting Highlighted Presidential Sessions
 
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Presidential Sessions

Tied to the 2022 Annual Meeting theme "Cultivating Equitable Education Systems for the 21st Century," the AERA Presidential Sessions provide rich and compelling content designed to engage attendess on key issues in education research, policy, and practice. All times are in Pacific Time.

Click on the session titles below to see the participants, session abstracts, date, time, and locations.

An Integenerational Conversation on Equity

California's Investment in Universal Preschool: What's the Role for Research?

Community Within: Activism and Community-based Research as a Way of Life

COVID-19 and Higher Education: Cultivating New Pathways to Higher Learning and Equity

Cultivating and Expanding Equitable Education Opportunity by Implementing Multicultural Research, Policy, and Practice

Educational Equity and Federal Education Policy Priorities

Envisioning New Paradigms for Civic Learning and Engagement

Expansive Futures for Disability Intersectional Learning Research Braiding Culture, History, Equity, and Enabling Technologies

Illusions of Queer Inclusion: On the Promise, Paradox, and Precarity of PK-12 LGBTQ+ Inclusive Educational Policy

“In the Face of What We Remember:” Why We Must Talk About Race in Education

Measuring Equity: How do we Measure Equity in Schools at Scale?

Philanthropy As A Lever for Racial Equity in Education

Quantitative Methods for Rigorous Equitable Research

Reimagining School Districts as Sites for Transformation

Research-Practice Partnerships for Educational Transformation

Teacher Preparation Evaluation Systems: What Would it Take to Put Equity at the Center?

The 25th Conversations with Senior Scholars on Advancing Research and Professional Development Related to Black Education

The Politics of Teaching and Learning about Race, Gender, and Inequality in an Era of Polarization and Restriction

The Wisdom of Practice: Meaningful Inclusion of Students with Disabilities

Toward the Fulfillment of Full Personhood: The Persistent Invisibility of Latinx Communities Across Institutions

What Happened to Diversity and Equity When Admissions Tests Became Optional?

20 Years of the War on Terror: Reflections on Militarism, Schooling, and Muslim Communities in the United States

Beyond Stopping Hate: Cultivating Safe, Equitable and Affirming Educational Systems for Asian/Asian American Students

Centering Cultural and Artistic Practice in Scientific Design

Continuous Improvement Research and Critical Theoretical Perspectives: Bridging Two Conversations with a Common Goal?

Cross-Cutting Issues in Mental Health & Wellness Equity

Early Childhood Education for a New Age: Centering Equity and Social Justice

Education’s Role in Cultivating Indigenous Futures

Ethnic Studies Curricula and the Critical Race Theory Backlash

How Can the Science of Human Learning and Development Inform Preparing Students to Engage in Civic Reasoning?

Interdisciplinary and Critical Conceptualizations of Climate Change Education and Research

K-12 Education Decision-Making in the Context of Covid-19

Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Building Systems for Racial Justice and Equity

Police-Free Schools: Education Research and Antiracist Movements

Reimagining Methodological Approaches for Disrupting anti-Blackness in STEM Education

Reimagining the Education Research Commons: Toward Epistemic Justice

Strengthening California Community Colleges: Research and Leadership Frontiers at a Time of Recovery

Technology for Learning: Advancing Equity or Maintaining the Status Quo?

#TheMoreYouKnow: Critical Data Practices with New Digital Media and Technologies towards Justice

The Status Quo Isn't Working: Forging New Paths in Educating Students with Disabilities in General Education

The Wisdom of Practice: Responsiveness to Multilingual Learners in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Tribal Sovereignty and Indigenous Education: Situating Land Tax, #LandBack, and Land Acknowledgments in Equity Discourse

Why Place? How Rural Education Research Can In/Transform Systems for Equitable Education

An Integenerational Conversation on Equity

Sunday, April 24, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Chair: Na'ilah Suad Nasir (Spencer Foundation)
Moderator: Na'ilah Suad Nasir (Spencer Foundation)
Panelist: Angela Glover Blackwell (Policy Link)
Panelist: Fred Blackwell (San Francisco Foundation)
Panelist: Edmund W. Gordon (Teachers College, Columbia University)

Abstract:

This session reflects on the nature of equity work, both in the present time and historically, and how issues of educational equity are deeply tied up with issues of housing, segregation, wealth inequality, healthcare, and other social systems and structures. In the education research community, scholars must reckon with how they themselves are working to create equitable systems. Thus, this conversation among these esteemed panelists will reflect on what is involved in the work of changing systems— how do systems change? What is the role of research, activism, and policy? How can we, as scholars, be a part of creating more equitable systems in education?

California’s Investment in Universal Preschool: What’s the Role for Research?

Friday, April 22, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6F

Session Participants:
Moderator: Hanna Melnick (Learning Policy Institute)
Chair: Linda Darling-Hammond (Learning Policy Institute)
Panelist: Rucker Johnson (University of California - Berkeley)
Panelist: Kevin McCarty (California State Assembly Member)
Panelist: Sarah Neville-Morgan (California Department of Education)
Panelist: Deborah Stipek (Stanford University)

Abstract:

California’s 2021 historic budget has reshaped early learning policy in the state. In addition to making needed investments in expanding access and reforming rates in child care, the budget makes major changes to preschool education with the expansion of transitional kindergarten (TK) to all 4-year-olds. The expansion of transitional kindergarten and preschool is an enormous policy opportunity, and as districts begin to implement this new grade level, they will need support from the state, researchers, and advocates to support implementation. The objective of this symposium is for researchers to learn about the historic expansion of preschool and transitional kindergarten in California and encourage the development of policy-relevant research that supports access to high-quality early learning.

Community Within: Activism and Community-based Research as a Way of Life

Friday, April 22, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6F

Session Participants:
Chair: Bianca Jontae Baldridge (Harvard University)
Chair: David O. Stovall (University of Illinois at Chicago) 
Presenter: Cierra Kaler-Jones (Communities for Just Schools Fund) 
Presenter: Naomi Mae W. (The Spencer Foundation) nmae@spencer.org
Presenter: Nikki McDaid (Northwestern University)
Presenter: Aja Reynolds (Wayne State University) 
Presenter: Uriel Serrano (University of California - Santa Cruz) 
Presenter: David C. Turner III (University of California, Los Angeles)

Abstract:

One important way that educational change toward more just systems occurs is through collaboration with community-based organizations, which have always been at the heart of movements for liberation. This community-based work is more than just a way to do research—it requires a deep respect for people, families, and communities and a belief in activism and ceding power as critical to social change. In this session, scholars, community activists, and educators will explore how their work and livelihoods are dedicated to and rooted in community work and advocacy. Panelists will explore how scholarship, advocacy, and work can intersect across the dimensions of community, justice, and liberation. We will focus on how scholars and activists craft their work to be in community and for the continual liberation of all peoples. Particularly, each panelist will highlight how community work, activism, and intentional collaboration are important ways to be true to their core values, and to do work that is impactful, and transformative within and beyond the academy.

COVID-19 and Higher Education: Cultivating New Pathways to Higher Learning and Equity

Sunday, April 24, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: OiYan A. Poon (The Spencer Foundation)
Discussant: OiYan A. Poon (The Spencer Foundation)
Presenter: Tangela Blakely Reavis (Saint Mary's College of California)
Presenter: Kelly Slay (Vanderbilt University)
Presenter: Christine Park (University of Hawaii)
Presenter: Bradley Ashburn (University of Hawaii)
Presenter: Joshua Lelemia Irvina (University of Hawaii)
Presenter: Lynette Maria Williamson (University of Hawaii - West Oahu)
Presenter: Cassandra M. D. Hart (University of California - Davis)
Presenter: Calley Marotta (Utah Valley University)

Abstract:

The COVID-19 pandemic has re-shaped higher education campus environments and climates across the globe. In some places this adaptation has meant governance challenges and decision-fatigue in higher education, and in other places, a shift in focus to community-based strengths and identifying new possibilities. This session features research on the multiple effects of the pandemic and considers innovative pathways to bring research to bear in creating new visions and systemic evidence-based changes in higher education that center on intersectional racial equity in particular.

Cultivating and Expanding Equitable Education Opportunity by Implementing Multicultural Research, Policy, and Practice

Sunday, April 24, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: James A. Banks (University of Washington - Seattle)
Presenter: Pedro A. Noguera (University of Southern California)
Presenter: Ozlem Sensoy (Simon Fraser University)
Presenter: Christine E. Sleeter (California State University - Monterey Bay)
Presenter: Tyrone C. Howard (University of California - Los Angeles)
Presenter: Linda Darling-Hammond (Learning Policy Institute)

Abstract:

To cultivate and expand equal educational opportunity, education must be reimagined and new systems created that foster transformative teaching and learning. The presentations in this session will focus on research, policies, and practices that provide a foundation for reimagining schooling so that students from diverse racial, cultural, social-class, and linguistic groups will attain high achievement levels. The topics that will be discussed include institutionalized racism; culturally responsive teaching; ethnic studies, and policies for redesigning schools for diverse population groups. The presentations in this session address complex educational issues based on chapters that will be published in a book commemorating the 25th Anniversary of the Multicultural Education Series at Teacher College Press, Transforming Multicultural Education Policy and Practice: Expanding Educational Opportunity.

Educational Equity and Federal Education Policy Priorities

Sunday, April 24, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6F

Session Participants:
Chair: Christopher Edley (University of California - Berkeley)
Discussant: Christopher Edley (University of California - Berkeley)
Speaker: Linda Darling-Hammond (Learning Policy Institute)
Respondent: Roberto Rodriguez (U.S. Department of Education)

Abstract:

Educational equity has been named as a key priority by the Biden administration, as well as by members of congress. Given the myriad of challenges in education in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the recent influx of funds to public schools at all levels from recent legislation, a deeper understanding of the role of the federal government to create the conditions for equity in education is in order. In this keynote talk, leading national educational policy expert, and advisor to President Biden, Professor Linda Darling-Hammond reflects on her perspective on what is at stake in this moment around educational equity and education policy, and what we are likely to see at the federal level.

Envisioning New Paradigms for Civic Learning and Engagement

Monday, April 25, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: Joel Westheimer (University of Ottawa) 
Discussant: James A. Banks (University of Washington - Seattle)
Discussant: Michelle Fine (City College of New York - CUNY)
Panelist: Bianca Jontae Baldridge (Harvard University)
Panelist: Kevin Lowell Clay (Virginia Commonwealth University)
Panelist: Thea Abu El-Haj (Barnard College)
Panelist: Antero Garcia (Stanford University)
Panelist: A. Susan Jurow (University of Colorado - Boulder) 
Panelist: Harper Benjamin Keenan (University of British Columbia) 
Panelist: LaGarrett Jarriel King (University of Missouri - Columbia)
Panelist: Kari Kokka (University of Pittsburgh)
Panelist: Nicole Mirra (Rutgers University) 
Panelist: Christopher Rogers (University of Pennsylvania) 
Panelist: Beth C. Rubin (Rutgers University) 
Panelist: Amanda R. Tachine (Arizona State University)

Abstract:

The current confluence of social inequity, political polarization, and pandemic-related educational upheaval demands original and expansive approaches to youth civic learning and engagement that can cultivate inquiry, solidarity, and common cause. Civic education – the school-based formation of citizens – must be re-envisioned as a means of understanding and addressing these ongoing struggles. This session convenes an intergenerational and interdisciplinary group of scholars to engage in dialogue about where the field of civics education has been and where it needs to go in order to meet the challenges of our current context. Such a conversation will necessarily trouble normative paradigms of civic education and open space for broadening and deepening how we think about civic learning and engagement.

Expansive Futures for Disability Intersectional Learning Research Braiding Culture, History, Equity, and Enabling Technologies

Saturday, April 23, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: Alfredo J. Artiles (Stanford University)
Chair: Kristen Jackson (Stanford University)
Chair: Madison Bunderson (Stanford University)
Chair: Frank Mondelli (Stanford University)
Discussant: Roy D. Pea (Stanford University)
Speaker: Shirin Vossoughi (Northwestern University)
Speaker: Susan Schweik (University of California - Berkeley)
Speaker: Jeannette Mancilla-Martinez (Vanderbilt University)
Speaker: Gabriela Richard (Pennsylvania State University)
Speaker: Safiya Noble (University of California - Los Angeles)

Abstract:

The goal of this session is to promote a paradigm expansion in the study of learning for students with disabilities, many of whom come from minoritized backgrounds. Drawing upon Galison’s idea of “trading zones,” we aim to generate transformative dialogues between scholars with distinct expertise. We will organize the session around three ensembles (20-minutes each): 1. Historical epistemologies, 2. Embodied learning in worlds of difference, and 3. Dissecting views of learning in risk algorithms. The purpose for each ensemble is to highlight key affordances and challenges in the study of learning, disability and/or equity, explore potential synergies across their respective research traditions, and map potential future research directions.

Illusions of Queer Inclusion: On the Promise, Paradox, and Precarity of PK-12 LGBTQ+ Inclusive Educational Policy

Thursday, April 21, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Chair: Bishop Owis (University of Toronto)
Presenter: Bethy Leonardi (University of Colorado - Boulder)
Presenter: Amy Nichole Farley (University of Cincinnati)
Presenter: Jon Michael Wargo (Boston College)
Presenter: Michael Kokozos (North Carolina State University)
Presenter: Maru Gonzalez (North Carolina State University)
Presenter: Kevin Kumashiro (Self-employed)
Discussant: Edward Brockenbrough (University of Pennsylvania)
Discussant: Joe Schmidt (New York Department of Education)

Abstract:

Currently six states legislations require that schools provide lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) inclusive instruction. Evidence suggests that queer-inclusive curriculum leads to improvements in school climate. At the same time, movements are underway to prohibit transgender youth access to gender-affirming medical care and dehumanizing attacks seeking to disarm systemic racism from being discussed in schools, colleges, and universities. In this session, a range of scholars will help nuance how, if at all, queer-inclusive policy helps redress educational inequities by forwarding systems that embrace equity and racial justice. Facilitated through a series of conceptual and empirical papers, presenters will detail the promise, paradox, and precarity of LGBTQ+ inclusive policy as refracted through the lens of in-service teachers, district leaders, community organizers, and teacher educators.

“In the Face of What We Remember:” Why We Must Talk About Race in Education

Thursday, April 21, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Moderator: David E. Kirkland (New York University)
Panelist: Gloria J. Ladson-Bilings (University of Wisconsin - Madison)
Panelist: Mark Rosenbaum (Public Counsel Opportunity Under Law)

Abstract:

In response to the stream of recent legislation proposed or passed limiting or prohibiting critical race theory in education, this session explores the question of race in education. It features a moderated conversation between two giants—Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings and Attorney Mark Rosenbaum. In a deep and deliberative conversation, they provide analyses of three broad questions, embracing an intersectional approach that defines educational equity at the fluid intersections of identities where students exist as plural, but also as possessing tools, supports, and conditions needed to experience success and joy in everyday learning. The session raises implications for how talking about race in education, particularly with respect to school systems that are too often found to be racially disproportionate, can be leveraged to more equitably serve and improve the institutional realities of students across lines of racial difference.

Measuring Equity: How do we Measure Equity in Schools at Scale?

Sunday, April 24, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m. 
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: Andrew Ho (Harvard University)
Panelist: Jeffrey M.R. Duncan-Andrade (San Francisco State University)
Panelist: Christopher Edley (University of California - Berkeley)
Panelist: Andrew Ho (Harvard University)
Panelist: Constance A. Lindsay (University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill)

Abstract:

In order to create equitable education systems, we must have ways of measuring equity effectively. Education research has historically measured equity in terms of parity of outcomes (equity in achievement levels, test scores, graduation rates, etc.) However, more recently scholars have shifted the focus beyond outcomes to inequities in inputs, including inputs at multiple levels, including the classroom, teacher practices, and school practices and policies. Establishing measures of equity (at scale) that get at these inputs in rigorous and reliable ways are essential to providing a high quality education, rigorous teaching and learning experiences, and environments that promote safety and well-being. This session explores key questions and tensions with respect to how we could measure equity in ways that are aligned with a forward-looking vision of education systems and possibility.

Philanthropy As A Lever for Racial Equity in Education

Monday, April 25, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6D

Session Participants:
Chair: Zoe Stemm-Calderson (Raikes Foundation)
Moderator: Zoe Stemm-Calderson (Raikes Foundation)
Speaker: Bob Hughes (Gates Foundation)
Speaker: Kent McGuire (The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation)
Speaker: Julie Mikuta (Schusterman Foundation)
Speaker: Jim Shelton (Blue Meridian)
Speaker: Na'ilah Suad Nasir (Spencer Foundation)

Abstract:

Philanthropy has an important role to play in creating the conditions for equity in education. Given the privileged position of philanthropy, what should that role be? Many foundations offered ambitious statements in the wake of the racial unrest of 2020, dedicating resources and prioritizing issues of racial equity. How is this work taking shape, and what are some key challenges and programs of work? How can scholars most productively work with philanthropy in creating the conditions for educational equity through research? What are some of the tensions in doing so? In this session, we hear from a panel of philanthropy leaders, at the forefront of finding ways to support equity in education and beyond.

Quantitative Methods for Rigorous Equitable Research

Saturday, April 23, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6F

Session Participants:
Chair: Sarah Peko-Spicer (American Institutes for Research)
Moderator: Sarah Peko-Spicer (American Institutes for Research)
Panelist: Prudence L. Carter (Brown University)
Panelist: Odis Johnson (Johns Hopkins University
Panelist: David E. Myers (American Institutes for Research)
Panelist: Elizabeth Tipton (Northwestern University)

Abstract:

Research across the methodological spectrum is important as we think about what anti-racist equitable research looks like. This is a relatively new conversation in the quantitative research community. For example, QuantCrit provides an approach which involves turning the lens of critical race theory onto quantitative research methods, including both the methods used and the interpretations provided. In this session, we bring into discussion experts on mixed methods, QuantCrit, evaluation methods, and statistical methods to ask: What does it mean for quantitative methods to be equity focused? The discussion will include how methodological choices impact the questions asked, the interpretation of findings, and where there is potential for the development of new methods.

Reimagining School Districts as Sites for Transformation

Saturday, April 23, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Chair: Caitlin Farrell (University of Colorado - Boulder)
Chair: Vidya Shah (York University)
Participant: Nikole Booker (New York City Department of Education)
Participant: Kingsley Botchway (Waterloo Community School District)
Participant: Jeewan Chanicka (Waterloo Community School District)
Participant: Ritu Khanna (San Francisco Unified School District)
Participant: Camille Williams-Taylor (Ottawa Carleton District School Board)
Discussant: Muhammad Khalifa (The Ohio State University - Columbus)  

Abstract:

The school district serves as the main organizing feature for local democratic control in education, and it is the central platform for educational decisions that impact teaching and learning. This session features district central office leaders that will speak to the challenges they are facing in these times, the generative possibilities that emerge amidst change and crisis, and how districts can operate as sites of struggle for freedom. We will explore how context enables and forecloses equitable, transformative approaches to district reform. With differences in school funding models, union presence, socio-political contexts, student diversities, and de/centralization, leaders from both the United States and Canada will help us imagine new ways of engaging with schools and communities.

Research-Practice Partnerships for Educational Transformation

Saturday, April 23, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, North Tower, Ground Level - Pacific Ballroom 19

Session Participants:
Chair: Amanda L. Datnow (University of California - San Diego)
Chair: Ung-Sang Lee (University of California - Los Angeles)
Chair: Sherice Clarke (University of California - San Diego) 
Presenter: Hayley Ryan Weddle (University of Pittsburgh), 
Presenter: Megan Hopkins (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Ung-Sang Lee (University of California - Los Angeles)
Presenter: Marcus Van (Mann UCLA Community School)
Presenter: Nicolette van Halem (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
Presenter: Alan J. Daly (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Yi-Hwa Liou (National Taipei University of Education)
Presenter: Marie Lockton (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: David Albert Rodes Trautman (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: David Vannasdall (Arcadia Unified School District)
Presenter: Alison Gallwey Wishard Guerra (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Amanda L. Datnow (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Shana R. Cohen (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Benjamin C. Kennedy (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Matthew Doyle (Vista Unified School District)
Presenter: Susan S. Yonezawa (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Mica Pollock (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Monica Sweet (UC San Diego)
Presenter: Nan Renner (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Alberto "Beto" Vasquez (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Minhtuyen Mai (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Makeba Jones (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Craig Gaustauer (Vista High School)
Presenter: Beth Simon (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Kirk D. Rogers (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Caesar Aceituno (UC San Diego)
Presenter: Sherice Clarke (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Andrea Sarah Gomoll (Indiana University - Bloomington)
Presenter: Katherine Dennis (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Sushil S (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Zaynab Amelia Gates (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Tarang Tripathi (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Christoforos Mamas (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Caren Holtzman (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Mariko Yoshisato (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Dolores de Los Angeles Lopez (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Erika Rae Reece (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Reed Kendall (University of California - San Diego)
Presenter: Amy Eguchi (University of California - San Diego)
Discussant: June Ahn (University of California - Irvine)

Abstract:

This session reports on research-practice partnerships (RPP) undertaken by university researchers in collaboration with K-12 practitioners and policymakers, working across levels of the educational system to redesign equitable and just systems of education. We leverage our diversity in RPP methodologies to build theory on institutional change that advances educational equity in the region. The session includes clustered poster presentations that share insights on RPP methodologies that impact policy, districts, pedagogy, and university institutional change. The poster session will be followed by dialogue to discuss issues germane to our institutional commitment to educational equity, including issues around ethics, training, and reconciliatory relational work necessary between universities, schools and communities that have been systemically underserved.

Teacher Preparation Evaluation Systems: What Would it Take to put Equity at the Center?

Sunday, April 24, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6C

Session Participants:
Chair: Marilyn Cochran-Smith (Boston College)
Discussant: Maria Salazar (University of Denver)
Presenter: Marilyn Cochran-Smith (Boston College)
Presenter: Emilie Mitescu Reagan (Claremont Graduate University)
Presenter: Wen-Chia Claire Chang (University of Nebraska - Lincoln)
Presenter: Stafford Hood (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Presenter: Mary E. Dilworth (Independent Researcher)
Presenter: Mark W. LaCelle-Peterson (Association for Advancing Quality in Educator Preparation)

Abstract:

For the last two decades, there has been widespread attention to teacher preparation evaluation and accountability from both within and outside the field. In fact, accountability has been regarded by many policy and other actors as a key mechanism for “fixing” teacher preparation, which has repeatedly been characterized as a “broken” system. This session takes up questions related to equity and teacher preparation evaluation systems by focusing on intersecting roles, layers of contexts, and organizations and by bringing together presenters who are differently positioned. The major goal of the session is to consider what it would mean, what it would take, and what it would look like to make equity the central goal of teacher preparation evaluation systems.

The 25th Conversations with Senior Scholars on Advancing Research and Professional Development Related to Black Education

Saturday, April 23, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, South Building, Level 3 - Marina Ballroom D

Session Participants:
Chair: Henry T. Frierson (University of Florida)
Chair: Rodney K. Hopson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Presenter: Wanda J. Blanchett (Rutgers University)
Presenter: Stephanie J. Rowley (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenter: Olga M. Welch (Duquesne University)
Presenter: James D. Anderson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Presenter: Donald Easton-Brooks (University of Nevada - Reno)
Presenter: Kofi Lomotey (Western Carolina University)
Presenter: Edmund W. Gordon (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenter: Jomills H. Braddock (University of Miami)
Presenter: Toks S. Fashola (American University)
Presenter: Will J. Jordan (Temple University)
Presenter: Geneva Gay (University of Washington)
Presenter: Valerie Kinloch (University of Pittsburgh)
Presenter: Carol D. Lee (Northwestern University)
Presenter: Fred Arthur Bonner (Prairie Vew A&M University)
Presenter: Lillian Brown Poats (Texas Southern University)
Presenter: Zollie Stevenson (Philander Smith College) 
Presenter: Walter R. Allen (University of California - Los Angeles)
Presenter: Phillip J. Bowman (University of Michigan)
Presenter: William T. Trent (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Presenter: Carl A. Grant (University of Wisconsin - Madison)
Presenter: Howard C. Johnson (Syracuse University)
Presenter: Monika Williams Shealey (Rowan University)
Presenter: Eugene L. Anderson (University of Virginia)
Presenter: Mary E. Dilworth (Independent Researcher)
Presenter: Monica B. Mitchell (MERAssociates)
Presenter: Michael Cunningham (Tulane University)
Presenter: James Earl Davis (Temple University)
Presenter: Carol Camp Yeakey (Washington University in St. Louis)
Presenter: Vivian L. Gadsden (University of Pennsylvania)
Presenter: Caesar R Jackson (North Carolina Central University)
Presenter: Na'ilah Suad Nasir (Spencer Foundation)
Presenter: Shaun R. Harper (University of Southern California)
Presenter: Ivory A. Toldson (Howard University)
Presenter: Jerome E. Morris (University of Missouri-St. Louis)
Presenter: Bernard Oliver (Georgia Gwinnett College)
Presenter: Charles I. Rankin (Kansas State University)
Presenter: Tamara Bertrand Jones (Florida State University)
Presenter: Stafford Hood (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) 
Presenter: Tyrone C. Howard (University of California - Los Angeles)
Presenter: William F. Tate (Louisiana State University)
Presenter: H. Richard Milner (Vanderbilt University)
Presenter: Maisha T. Winn (University of California - Davis)
Presenter: Jerlando F.L. Jackson (University of Wisconsin - Madison)
Presenter: Chance W. Lewis (University of North Carolina - Charlotte)
Presenter: Joyce E. King (Georgia State University)
Presenter: Gaëtane Jean-Marie (Rowan University)
Presenter: Victoria Showunmi (UCL Institute of Education, London)

Abstract:

Initiated at the 1997 Annual Meeting in Chicago, the 2022 session of “The Continuation of Conversations with Senior Scholars on Advancing Research and Professional Development Related to Black Education” will be number 25 in this popular and widely heralded series. Number 24 was initially scheduled this past April in San Francisco but because of COVID-19, our session was postponed to this year, but instead of an in-person session in Orlando, it was held virtually. Now, the 25th session is scheduled to held in April 2022 in San Diego.

We were granted Presidential Session status in1999 in Montreal—thus, the San Diego session will mark 23 years as a Presidential Session. Importantly, we have some of the most notable education scholars in the country participate as topic discussion leaders. In 1997, we started with 12 tables and now we will have 19 tables for 2022. Over the years, we have averaged approximately 10-12 participants per table, not counting topic leaders. In the 2018 and 2019 meetings in San Antonio and Toronto, respectively, many estimated the participant numbers as in the 300 range. We should expect similar participation levels in San Diego.

The Politics of Teaching and Learning about Race, Gender, and Inequality in an Era of Polarization and Restriction

Sunday April 24, 9:45 to 11:15 a.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Chair: Janelle T. Scott (University of California - Berkeley)
Panelist: Mica Pollack (University of California, San Diego)
Panelist: Sumi Cho (African American Policy Forum) 
Panelist: Adrienne D. Dixson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Panelist: Francesca Lopez (The Pennsylvania State University)
Panelist: Jeremy C. Young (PEN America) 

Abstract:

At least 41 states have enacted or proposed over 160 legislative restrictions on curriculum in K-12 schooling since January 2021. This interactive panel will discuss the recent legislative and localized efforts to ban or restrict curriculum, accurate teaching about race and racism, books, and content related to LGBTQ+ people and issues. Panelists will consider who and what organizations are driving these efforts, how teachers, students, and educational leaders (along with civil rights and other organizations) are resisting the bans and restriction efforts, and what the politics of curriculum bans in a diverse, divided, and unequal society tell us about the power and potential of public education, as well as its vulnerability.

.The Wisdom of Practice: Meaningful Inclusion of Students with Disabilities

Thursday, April 21, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6D

Session Participants:
Chair: Ilana S. Horn (Vanderbilt University)
Facilitator: Irene H. Yoon (University of Utah) 
Panelist: Ethan d'Ablemont-Burnes (Boston Public Schools) 
Panelist: Alfredo J. Artiles (Stanford University) 
Panelist: Margaret R. Beneke (University of Washington)
Panelist: Vanessa Jobe (Salt Lake City School District) 
Panelist: Joy Resmovits (Seattle Times)
Panelist: Victor Joyner (Boston Public Schools)
Panelist: Kathleen King Thorius (Indiana University - IUPUI) 

Abstract:

To make progress on complex educational problems, researchers and practitioners need to collaborate on solutions. Too often, the knowledge that informs policy flows from research toward practice rather than the other way around. Additionally, knowledge development in the research community unfolds differently than it does among practitioners, leaving epistemic gaps that can be productively explored in supported dialogue. In this panel, we highlight the practitioner experience of supporting students with disabilities (SWD) because it strengthens an intersectional understanding of inclusion; and of the complex, messy, inseparability of individual, community, and systems. These perspectives open up possibilities so researchers and practitioners together can identify different, better questions and goals for meaningful inclusion and humanizing school environments for diverse SWD.

Toward the Fulfillment of Full Personhood: The Persistent Invisibility of Latinx Communities Across Institutions

Monday April 25, 9:45 to 11:15 a.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Chair: Kris D. Gutiérrez (University of California - Berkeley)
Discussant: Angela Valenzuela (The University of Texas at Austin)
Discussant: Guadelupe Valdes (Stanford University)
Presenter: Alfredo J. Artiles (Stanford University)
Presenter: Cecilia Rios-Aguilar (University of California - Los Angeles)
Presenter: Krista L. Cortes (University of California - Berkeley
Presenter: Amalia Z. Dache (University of Pennsylvania)
Presenter: Laura Munoz (University of Nebraska)
Presenter: Manuel Espinoza (University of Colorado - Denver)
Presenter: Sofia A. Villenas (Cornell University)
Presenter: Cindy Cruz (University of Arizona)
Presenter: Luis Urrieta (The University of Texas at Austin)
Presenter: Dolores Calderon (Western Washington University) 
Presenter: Anne-Marie Nunez (The Ohio State University)
Presenter: Gina Ann Garcia (University of Pittsburgh)

Abstract:

The demand for “paramount national citizenship” was the creed of the abolitionists after the civil war. And it has been an ambition of Mexican immigrants who settled in the US since the first communities were formed: to be treated equally and justly. (See: J. Gomez-Quiñones “Roots of Chicano Politics.”) A call to be treated as fully human has endured within and across the hugely diverse Latinx communities.

This session brings together intergenerational pairs of Latinx scholars to engage a range of relevant topics that both remain central or at the edges of new scholarship with implications for the field, the academy and communities. The pairs will engage a series of questions to create dynamic conversations that will cumulatively contribute to the larger focus on achieving full personhood as a community.

What Happened to Diversity and Equity When Admissions Tests Became Optional?

Saturday, April 23, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6C

Session Participants:
Chair: Emma Klugman (Harvard University)
Chair: Elizabeth Tipton (Northwestern University)
Moderator: Emma Klugman (Harvard University)
Panelist: Dominique Baker (Southern Methodist University)
Panelist: Li Cai (University of California - Los Angeles)
Panelist: Youlonda Copeland-Morgan (University of California - Los Angeles)
Panelist: Jenny Rickard (The Common Application)
Panelist: Michael E. Walker (Educational Testing Service)

Abstract:

In the 2022 admissions cycle, over two thirds of US bachelor granting schools were SAT/ACT optional; a 50% increase compared to 2019 (FairTest, 2021). Some argue that this change could increase equity in admissions, since racial and income-based test score disparities have been a longstanding issue for admissions tests. Others, however, hold that test scores help to level playing fields, and that without them, admissions will focus more on “gameable” factors, such as essays, high school grades, and recommendation letters–all factors that are also known to vary by race and income. In this session, we bring together distinguished speakers from academia, admissions, and industry to discuss these perspectives, what happened in the 2022 admissions cycle, and to chart a more equitable future.

Beyond Stopping Hate: Cultivating Safe, Equitable and Affirming Educational Systems for Asian/Asian American Students

Saturday, April 23, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6D

Session Participants:
Chair: Betina Hsieh (California State University - Long Beach)
Discussant: Okhee Lee (New York University)
Panelist: Ruchi Agarwal-Rangnath (University of San Francisco)
Panelist: Emy Chen (Los Alamitos School District)
Panelist: Edward R. Curammeng (California State University - Dominguez Hills)
Panelist: Eunice Ho (Anaheim Union School District)
Panelist: Tracy La (VietRise)
Panelist: Mark Takano (United States House of Representatives)

Abstract:

In the last 18 months, Asian diasporic and Asian American communities have faced a public wave of targeted violence and xenophobia. While necessary attention has been focused on multiple disturbing acts of violence and overt racism against Asian Americans, less discussion has focused on ways to support and create safe, equitable and affirming educational systems for Asian and Asian American students. This session brings together a panel of representatives from diverse contexts and levels in a facilitated discussion focused on cultivating safe, equitable and affirming educational systems for Asian/Asian Americans students. Panelists will consider the roles that multiple stakeholders can play in making schooling and community education spaces places where Asian/Asian American students can thrive.

Centering Cultural and Artistic Practice in Scientific Design

Monday, April 25, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Chair: Arnetha F. Ball (Stanford University)
Presenter: Keith G. Cross (University of Hawaii - Manoa)
Presenter: Keawe'aimoku Kaholokula (University of Hawaii - Manoa)
Presenter: Django Paris (University of Washington)
Presenter: Jamie Christine Simpson Steele (University of Hawaii - Manoa)
Participant: Casey Philip Wong (University of California - Los Angeles)

Abstract:

Cultivating equitable education systems requires anchoring our research practices in the ways of knowing and development that are important in the communities we serve, and seeking to understand the contexts in which they occur. This presidential session features scholars whose work utilizes scientific discovery to sustain cultural and artistic practice and/or explores innovative ways to make the knowledge thus produced accessible to multiple communities. The goal of this session is to highlight ways in which researchers’ membership within a culture/community and mastery of its practices can help us rethink scientific design, as well as inform our understanding of the shared constructs upon which equitable education systems can be created and sustained.

Continuous Improvement Research and Critical Theoretical Perspectives: Bridging Two Conversations with a Common Goal?

Monday, April 25, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6F

Session Participants:
Chair: Louis M. Gomez (University of California - Los Angeles)
Presenter: Sarah Duncan (Network for College Success)
Presenter: David O. Stovall (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Participant: John B. Diamond (University of Wisconsin - Madison)
Moderator: Jennifer Lin Russell (University of Pittsburgh)
Discussant: Charles Payne (Rutgers University - Newark)

Abstract:

This symposium brings together the Continuous Improvement and Critical Theory communities in a shared intellectual space looking toward cross-fertilization and common ground. At the center of the symposium are two interventions. The first design emerges from Critical Theory, and the other arises from Continuous Improvement. The interventions will spark dialogue that bridges a common language across the Critical Race Theory and Continuous Improvement communities. Both communities are concerned with understanding and changing systems that lead to educational mistreatment and oppression of those who live with diminished opportunity. However, each community differs in how they talk about and how they engage in intervention and improvement. The symposium will be an opportunity to cultivate common ground through conversation and critique.

Cross-Cutting Issues in Mental Health & Wellness Equity

Friday, April 22, 4:15 to 5:45 p.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Chair: Travis J. Bristol (University of California - Berkeley)
Panelist: Seanna C Leath (University of Virginia)
Panelist: Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales (San Francisco State University)
Panelist: Amanda R. Tachine (Arizona State University)

Abstract:

Mental health and wellness are important in supporting the holistic well-being of children, communities, teachers, and educational stakeholders. Currently, we are in the midst of what some have called a mental health crisis in education, cutting across k-12 and higher education, whereby young people and educators are facing a scale of stressors and mental health challenges that we are only beginning to understand. These issues of mental health and wellness are also racialized, with escalating needs among young people and teachers of color, cultural stigmas against seeking mental health support, and systems that fail to provide access to care. This session reflects on these pervasive and acute issues, taking as central how mental health and wellness challenges are exacerbated by other forms of structural inequities, and explores the possibility for better holistic mental wellness among youth, communities, families, educators, and within higher education.

Early Childhood Education for a New Age: Centering Equity and Social Justice

Monday, April 25, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6F

Session Participants:
Chair: Daniel Meier (San Francisco State University)
Discussant: Daniel Meier (San Francisco State University)
Presenter: Iliana Alanis (The University of Texas - San Antonio)
Presenter: Fabienne Doucet (William T. Grant Foundation)
Presenter: Isauro M. Escamilla Calan (San Francisco Unified School District and San Francisco State University)
Presenter: Iheoma U. Iruka (University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill)

Abstract:

This panel calls for a renewed effort to place social, racial, and educational justice and equity at the heart of early childhood curricular and assessment systems. To address the glaring inequities and injustices in the field exposed by Covid-19, research must play a more participatory and cross-disciplinary role both within the academy and the field. The panel addresses new pathways for equitable access to early childhood programs and approaches that center social inclusion and academic excellence. The panel features participants representing early childhood practitioners, teacher educators, educational non-profits, and equity research action coalitions. In dialogue and collaboration, we will highlight opportunities for new partnerships for improving early childhood systems for all children, families, and educators, especially those in historically marginalized communities.

Education’s Role in Cultivating Indigenous Futures

Monday, April 25, 4:15 to 5:45 p.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Moderator: Megan Bang (Spencer Foundation and Northwestern University) 
Presenter: Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy (Arizona State University)
Presenter: Anthony B. Craig (University of Washington)
Presenter: Ananda Marin (University of California - Los Angeles)
Presenter: Keiki Kawai’ae’a (ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language) 
Presenter: Linda T. Smith (Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi) 
Presenter: Malia Villegas (National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center)

Abstract:

What forms of education are necessary for thriving Indigenous futures, given the many and intersecting challenges of our time? Indigenous peoples have illuminated the impacts of imperial educational systems driven through colonial practices. Economic, social, and educational systems are working as they were intended--to harm, exclude, and erase Indigenous peoples. In the last year there have been discoveries of children’s bodies at boarding schools in the U.S. and Canada, followed by promises of reconciliation. How does one reconcile the future for children who are no longer alive? One way is to imagine the conditions that are necessary for their peoples, lands, and waters to thrive. In this session, Indigenous scholars will respond to the framing question and share forms of Indigenous education from specific territories, the conditions needed for such models to grow, and the ways scholarship can contribute.

Ethnic Studies Curricula and the Critical Race Theory Backlash

Monday, April 25, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6D

Session Participants:
Chair: E. Diane Torres-Valesquez (University of New Mexico)
Moderator: E. Diane Torres-Valesquez (University of New Mexico) 
Panelist: David G. Hinojosa (Intercultural Development Research Association)
Panelist: Theresa Montano (California State University - Northridge)
Panelist: Richard Martinez (Civil Rights Attorney)
Panelist: Angela Valenzuela (The University of Texas at Austin)

Abstract:

This presidential session examines the consequences of legislation that bans Critical Race Theory (CRT), one of the many theoretical lenses used in Ethnic Studies and culturally relevant teaching, at state and national levels. Anti-CRT legislation has passed or is threatened to pass in at least ten states. Right-wing ideologues and organizers are actively working to instill fear of CRT in families of all ethnic backgrounds across the country. This panel reframes the struggle as an attack on the growing and successful Ethnic Studies Movement clarifying the relationship and interplay with CRT. Legal avenues for litigation based on First and Equal Protection Fourteenth Amendment Constitutional Rights, legal and historical frames and Civil Rights arguments are addressed.

How Can the Science of Human Learning and Development Inform Preparing Students to Engage in Civic Reasoning?

Friday, April 22, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6D

Session Participants:
Chair: Carol D. Lee (Northwestern University)
Presenter: Carol D. Lee (Northwestern University)
Presenter: Roy D. Pea (Stanford University)
Presenter: Na'ilah Suad Nasir (Spencer Foundation)
Presenter: James D. Anderson (University of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign)
Presenter: Linda Darling-Hammond (Learning Policy Institute)
Discussant: Kris D. Gutiérrez (University of California - Berkeley)
Discussant: Alan H. Schoenfeld (University of California - Berkeley)

Abstract:

This symposium draws from two recent syntheses: Educating for Civic Reasoning and Discourse (Lee, White & Dong, 2020) by the National Academy of Education and The Handbook on the Cultural Foundations of Learning (Nasir et al, 2020). The presentations synthesize from these two publications, but also extend the findings to address the conceptual, systemic, and ecological tasks that must unfold if we are to transform the opportunities for our young people to prepare for the complex and consequential challenges of sustaining our democracy, including the special role education – broadly defined – plays in such transformation. It addresses recent contestations over how schools address the country’s complex history and how these dilemmas must be addressed in all content areas across the K-12 sector.

Interdisciplinary and Critical Conceptualizations of Climate Change Education and Research

Friday, April 22, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
AERA Presidential Session Virtual Session Rooms, AERA Presidential Session Virtual Paper Session Room

Session Participants:
Chair: Oren Pizmony Levy (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenter: Erica Violet Lee (Independent Scholar)
Presenter: Fikile Nxumalo (University of Toronto)
Presenter: Pablo Montes (The University of Texas - Austin)
Presenter: Sarah E. Truman (University of Melbourne)
Presenter: Mica Estrada (University of California - San Francisco)
Presenter: Marcia McKenzie (University of Saskatchewan)
Presenter: Kalervo N. Gulson (The University of Sydney)
Presenter: Joseph A. Henderson (Paul Smith's College)
Presenter: David E. Long (Morehead State University)
Presenter: Bronwyn G. Bishop (Paul Smith's College)
Presenter: Natalie Andrea Cross (Paul Smith's College)

Abstract:

Given that climate change is one of the defining educational contexts in the 21st century, we ask this question of our educational research community: What is the role of education and educational research as we attempt to “cultivate equitable educational systems” in a world dominated by climate breakdown and related emergencies? This presidential session adds to a still relatively nascent literature in climate change education by drawing in diverse disciplines and key critical issues for climate change education and research.

K-12 Education Decision-Making in the Context of Covid-19

Monday, April 25, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: John B. Diamond (Universiy of Wisconsin - Madison)
Panelist: Catherine Biddle (University of Maine)
Panelist: Charles Dupre (Texas Association of School Administrators)
Panelist: Christopher Lee Thomas (University of Texas at Tyler)
Panelist: Elizabeth Todd-Breland (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Panelist: Adriana Villavicencio (University of California - Irvine)

Abstract:

This presidential session explores education-related decision-making processes and outcomes that emerged in response to the Covid-19 pandemic and the immediate and anticipated long-term consequences. Panelists will analyze the values, priorities, principles, information, and/or processes that guided Covid-19 pandemic related decision-making approaches and to what effect. By focusing on education stakeholders’ Covid-19 decision-making and consequences, this session invites AERA attendees to imagine the societal conditions that must be established post-Covid-19 to ensure that educators can indeed go about the work of cultivating equitable educational systems for the 21st century.

Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Building Systems for Racial Justice and Equity

Saturday, April 23, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6D

Session Participants:
Chair:  H. Richard Milner (Vanderbilt University)
Discussant: Elon Dancy (University of Pittsburgh)
Presenter: Mariana Souto-Manning (Erikson Institute)
Presenter: Jessica Martell (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenter: Karina Malik (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenter: Patricia Pion (New York City Department of Education)
Presenter: Bryant O. Best (Vanderbilt University)
Presenter: Laura Fittz (Vanderbilt University)
Presenter: Jacob Bennett (Vanderbilt University)
Presenter: H. Richard Milner (Vanderbilt University)
Presenter: Mark Anthony Gooden (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenter: Joshua Childs (The University of Texas at Austin)
Presenter: Ain A. Grooms (The University of Iowa)
Presenter: Sheneka M. Williams (Michigan State University)
Presenter: Ebony O. McGee (Vanderbilt University)
Panelist: Perry Daniel (Indianapolis Public Schools)
Panelist: Patricia Payne (Indianapolis Public Schools) 

Abstract:

This presidential session centers a multidisciplinary approach in examining educational systems that hinder and propel racial and social justice. Bringing together researchers across disciplines, presenters interrogate common and varied challenges we face in building equitable systems and opportunities that reach the “full potential of people and communities." Presenters not only critically engage policies and practices that historically and systematically undermine educational and social success across time and space but also theorize about mechanisms to disrupt inequitable, racist, homophobic, and xenophobic processes. Indeed, presenters, “identify, study, and
enhance existing efforts to move systems toward equity to support all learners across the lifespan, from early childhood to K–12 to higher education and adult learning.” 

Police-Free Schools: Education Research and Antiracist Movements

Saturday, April 23, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: Mark R. Warren (University of Massachussetts - Boston)
Panelist: Maisie Chin (Community Asset Development Re-defining Education)
Panelist: Decoteau J. Irby (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Panelist: Kesha S. Moore (Thurgood Marshall Institute, NAACP Legal Defense Fund)
Panelist: Russell J. Skiba (Indiana University)
Panelist: Jonathan Stith (National Coordinator for the Alliance Educational Justice)
Discussant: Shawn A. Ginwright (San Francisco State University)

Abstract:

This session examines the dynamic intersection of research and action in the movement for police-free schools. It brings scholars and community organizers together to compare insights from education research and from antiracist movements. The session will consider the following questions: what kinds of research is needed to help build the capacity of antiracist movements for police-free schools and expand their abolitionist vision and program for alternatives? What insights come from grassroots efforts to remove police from schools and transform school climates that can inform understanding of the nexus between education and criminalization and white supremacist systems more broadly? What are future directions to connect scholarship and organizing and reimagine safe, humane and liberatory education beyond systems of discipline, punishment and criminalization?

Reimagining Methodological Approaches for Disrupting Anti-Blackness in STEM Education

Saturday, April 23, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6D

Session Participants:
Chair: Erica D. McCray (University of Florida)
Discussant: Kimberley Gomez (University of California - Los Angeles)
Discussant: Leslie Russell (Chicago Public Schools)
Presenter: Fikile Nxumalo (University of Toronto)
Presenter: Tia C. Madkins (The University of Texas at Austin)
Presenter: Karisma Morton (University of North Texas)
Presenter: Terrell Roderick Morton (University of Missouri - Columbia)
Presenter: Nickolaus Alexander Ortiz (Georgia State University)
Presenter: Yasmiyn Irizarry (The University of Texas at Austin)
Presenter: Mildred Boveda (The Pennsylvania State University)
Presenter: Nicol R. Howard (University of Redlands)

Abstract:

In this session, we will discuss innovative methodological approaches researchers can use to examine how educators, scholar activists, and collaborators work to disrupt anti-Blackness in PK – 20 STEM learning environments. Scholars in this session are guided by the desire to move beyond narratives that place a hyper-focus on the pervasiveness of anti-Blackness in STEM classrooms to, instead, address how to disrupt anti-Blackness. As such, the session papers focus on critical methodological approaches across STEM contexts that decenter whiteness. In doing so, this session contributes to our understanding of (re)humanizing research and pedagogical practices across STEM contexts, essential elements of (re)designing classrooms for equity, and transformative ways scholars in the field can approach this line of research.

Reimagining the Education Research Commons: Toward Epistemic Justice

Friday, Aprl 22, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: Pamela A. Moss (University of Michigan)
Chair: James W. Hammond (University of Michigan)
Presenter: June Ahn (University of California – Irvine)
Presenter: Megan Bang (Spencer Foundation and Northwestern University)
Presenter: Angela N. Booker (University of California – San Diego)
Presenter: Shirin Vossoughi (School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University)
Presenter: Ezekiel J. Dixon-Roman (The University of Pennsylvania)
Presenter: Drew H. Gitomer (Rutgers University)
Presenter: Kevin Crouse (Rutgers University)
Presenter: William R. Penuel (University of Colorado – Boulder)
Presenter: Robbin Reidy (University of California – Boulder)

Abstract:

Cultivating equitable education systems for the 21st-century requires critical attention to the education research commons: the knowledge resources we share, the sociotechnical infrastructures we rely on, the practices through which we work, and the principles underlying them. Our goal in this interactive session is to catalyze dialogue on the design of the education research commons, inspired by presenters’ concrete visions of possible futures, and framed by synergies and tensions in literatures on open science, epistemic (in)justice, pluriversality, infrastructure studies, and knowledge commons. Participants will interact in small groups, organized by six visions for aspects of the research commons, to share their perspectives on the design of the education research commons. A report documenting contributions of presenters and participants will offer a resource for continuing design dialogue.

Strengthening California Community Colleges: Research and Leadership Frontiers at a Time of Recovery

Monday, April 25, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Moderator: Susanna Cooper (University of California - Davis)
Participant: Julianna Barnes (Cuyamaca College)
Participant: Edward Bush (Cosumnes River College)
Participant: Michal Kurlaender (University of California - Davis)
Participant: Fracisco Rodriguez (Los Angeles Community College District)
Participant: Cecilia Rios-Aguilar (University of California - Los Angeles)

Abstract:

This symposium will feature an interactive conversation between researchers and leaders about the current challenges and opportunities for strengthening community colleges to meet the needs of the communities and students they serve. The conversation will be anchored in several research-practice partnerships between scholars and California Community College leaders. These partnerships will feature work aimed at understanding: (1) leadership for equity during turbulent times; (2) efforts to strengthen basic needs and resources for key student populations; and (3) structural and policy changes that center racial equity. The symposium will conclude with a broader conversation on the critical research and practice needs facing community colleges amidst pandemic recovery efforts.

Technology for Learning: Advancing Equity or Maintaining the Status Quo?

Tuesday, April 26, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: Sepehr Vakil (Northwestern University)
Panelist: Christopher Hoadley (New York University)
Panelist: Nichole Pinkard (Northwestern University)
Panelist: Cameron White (New Schools New Ventures)

Abstract:

The COVID-19 pandemic has created the conditions for renewed debate about the role of technology and learning, though the tensions around how, when, and for what purposes we use technology in the classroom has long been a source of debate. One perspective has viewed technology as a great equalizer, whereby technology expands access to knowledge and learning resources. Others have argued that technology alone will not change our systems, and in some cases will only deepen the nature of existing inequities. Still others have raised concerns about the extent to which our educational technology products center equity in their design. This session reflects, from various perspectives, the role of technology in learning as it relates to equity.

#TheMoreYouKnow: Critical Data Practices with New Digital Media and Technologies towards Justice

Thursday, April 21, 4:15 to 5:45 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: Angela Calabrese Barton (University of Michigan)
Discussant: Thomas M. Philip (University of California - Berkeley)
Discussant: Andrew Fellows (University of Maryland)
Presenter: Amy Stornaiuolo (University of Pennsylvania)
Presenter: Ebony Elizabeth Thomas (University of Pennsylvania)
Presenter: Sepehr Vakil (Northwestern University)
Presenter: Alisa Reith (Northwestern University)
Presenter: Natalie Araujo Melo (Northwestern University)
Presenter: Christopher Spencer (Family Matters)
Presenter: Angela Calabrese Barton (University of Michigan)
Presenter: Day W. Greenberg (University of Michigan - Ann Arbor)
Presenter: Chandler Turner (University of Michigan - Ann Arbor)
Presenter: Leslie R. Herrenkohl (University of Michigan - Ann Arbor)
Presenter: Edna Tan (University of North Carolina at Greensboro)
Presenter: Ti'Era Worsley (University of North Carolina - Greensboro)
Presenter: Tamara L. Clegg (University of Maryland - College Park)
Presenter: Erianne Weight
Presenter: Daniel Greene
Presenter: Niklas Elmqvist
Presenter: Keaunna Cleaveland

Abstract:

There is an urgent need to explore justice-oriented questions of what it means to engage with data, what data is, what gets datafied, and who benefits and gets hurt in the process. As data get commoditized and democratized, new approaches must extend beyond how people learn with/about data to include future-looking arrangements. This symposium attends to the ethical and political dimensions of learners' navigations as they seek to come to know and act in the present and towards desired futures in the increasingly abstracted and datafied world. Panelists and discussants from STEM education, literacy, in/formal education, learning sciences, cultural studies, and critical race studies, share insights on critical data practices as everyday learning and action-taking across space and time.

The Status Quo Isn't Working: Forging New Paths in Educating Students with Disabilities in General Education

Tuesday, April 26, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6E

Session Participants:
Chair: Julie Jackson-Cohen (University of Virginia)
Chair: Nathan Jones (Boston University)
Participant: Deborah Loewenberg Ball (University of Michigan)
Participant: Robert Q. Berry (University of Virginia)
Participant: Lynsey K. Gibbons (Boston University)
Participant: Nancy C. Jordan (University of Delaware)
Participant: Sarah Rannells Powell (The University of Texas at Austin)
Discussant: Brandon Cardet-Hernandez (Ivy Street School)
Discussant: Kevin Dykema (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics)

Abstract:

A persistent, and often ignored, social justice issue in education is ensuring equitable and just outcomes for students with disabilities. One primary barrier in achieving these goals is that special education researchers and general education researchers typically function as separate communities of practice. To improve academic success for students with disabilities, it will be necessary to confront these communities’ differences head on. Our goal for this session is to address these issues using the case of mathematics. We will bring together leading scholars from the fields of mathematics education and special education to: a) identify points of convergence, b) identify lingering dissensus, and c) cultivate new models that incorporate the perspective of educators from across the two fields.

The Wisdom of Practice: Responsiveness to Multilingual Learners in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Sunday, April 24, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6C

Session Participants:
Chair: Ilana S. Horn (Vanderbilt University) 
Facilitator: Amanda L. Datnow (University of California - San Diego) 
Presenter: Renae Bryant (Anaheim Union High School District) 
Presenter: Claudia G. Cervantes-Soon (Arizona State University) 
Presenter: Alison G Dover (California State University - Fullerton) 
Presenter: Rafael Olavide (Vista Unified School District) 
Presenter: Manka M. Varghese (University of Washington) 
Presenter: Alia Wong (USA Today) 

Abstract:

To make progress on complex educational problems, researchers and practitioners need to collaborate on solutions. Too often, the knowledge that informs policy flows from research toward practice rather than the other way around. Emergent multilingual students have historically been disproportionately impacted by pervasive educational inequities, such as systemic racism and linguistic inaccessibility. These inequities were magnified during the COVID-19 pandemic, as educational systems struggled to address disparities in access to out-of-school learning environments, technology, and access to affirming, engaging, and culturally and linguistically accessible curriculum. In this session, we learn from schools and districts who countered this trend by both navigating pandemic-related tensions and leveraging opportunities for systemic change during this challenging time.

Tribal Sovereignty and Indigenous Education: Situating Land Tax, #LandBack, and Land Acknowledgments in Equity Discourse

Satuday, April 23, 4:15 to 5:45 p.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6D

Session Participants:
TBA

Abstract:

Across all sectors of settler colonial schooling, Indigenous Peoples continuously reckon with the relevance of equity discourse in sovereignty efforts. The #LandBack and land-tax movement, discovery of unmarked gravesites at residential schools in the U.S. and Canada, respectful return of ancestors by universities, uncritical uptake of land acknowledgements by institutions, and the public critique of land-grant institutions in the expropriation of Indigenous lands have all opened conversations regarding living in right relations with Indigenous lands, waters, and Peoples. This session will bring into conversation leaders from the local Kumeyaay Nation – those Indigenous to San Diego – and leading scholars to discuss the complexity of these efforts and movements in relation to Indigenous education and tribal sovereignty.

Why Place? How Rural Education Research Can In/Transform Systems for Equitable Education

Saturday, April 23, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6F

Session Participants:
Chair: Amy Price Azano (Virginia Tech)
Speaker: Crystal Renee Chambers (East Carolina University)
Speaker: Maria R. Coady (University of Florida)
Speaker: Alex Red Corn (Kansas State University)
Speaker: Loni Crumb (East Carolina University)
Speaker: Darris Roshawn Means (University of Pittsburgh)
Speaker: Vanessa Ann Sansone (The University of Texas - San Antonio)

Abstract:

This presidential town hall draws attention to the underrepresented rural contexts in educational research, particularly for educators and researchers in racially, ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse rural contexts. This session brings together rural education scholars from a range of scholarly interests related to the educational opportunities and outcomes for Black, Latinx, Indigenous, rural Appalachian, and Emergent Bilingual populations. Presenters will address ways to cultivate a more just rural experience; adopt empowering, asset-based ideological stances in research and practice; address implicit and explicit biases toward rural people and places; and, ultimately, work across disciplines and leverage partnerships to address the socio-emotional wellbeing of rural students, especially those from historically marginalized groups most impacted by economic, health, and racial disparities.

20 Years of the War on Terror: Reflections on Militarism, Schooling, and Muslim Communities in the United States

Monday, April 25, 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.
San Diego Convention Center, Floor: Upper Level, Ballroom 6C

Session Participants:
Chair: Arshad Imtiaz Ali (George Washington University)
Moderator: Arshad Imtiaz Ali (George Washington University)
Speaker: Tracy Lachica Buenavista (California State University - Northridge)
Speaker: Mariam Durrani (Hamilton College)
Speaker: Thea Abu El-Haj (Barnard College)
Speaker: Marc Lamont Hill (Temple University)
Speaker: Muhammad Khalifa (The Ohio State University - Columbus)
Speaker: Miwa Takeuchi (University of Calgary)

Abstract:

In August 2021 the United States ended its occupation of Afghanistan, twenty years after September 2001. This is a significant moment to reflect on how the War on Terror has shaped education in the 21st century. Scholars will explore what the War on Terror has meant for Muslim youth, for communities of color, and for the possibilities of schooling. The speakers will examine the normalization of militarism in schools and how students, parents, teachers, families, and communities have responded to this context. Panelists will also reflect on how scholars, educators, and community members can continue to imagine and build possible educational futures.

 
 

 
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