2018 Annual Meeting Key Sessions
 
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2018 AERA Annual Meeting

"The Dreams, Possibilities, and Necessity of Public Education"
Friday, April 13 - Tuesday, April 17, 2018
New York City
#AERA18


The full online program is available here!


This page will be updated as additional sessions and details become available.


Major Addresses and Lectures


Opening Plenary: "Imagining Radically, Practicing Hope: How Public Education Could Disrupt Racial Injustice"


The opening plenary session, titled “Imagining Radically, Practicing Hope: How Public Education Could Disrupt Racial Injustice, will be an enriching discussion featuring a panel of educators, researchers, activists, and historians who will launch our collective conversation about public education, its central role in our struggle for justice, and the lessons we must learn from those who came before us.

The meeting theme, “The Dreams, Possibilities, and Necessity of Public Education,” asks our community to recognize, organize, and mobilize our knowledge and experience to imagine a public education we do not yet have. The opening plenary—and the meeting—will encourage vigorous imagining of a public education of and for our multiple communities. 

Chairs: Deborah Lowenberg Ball, Carla D. O'Connor, Suzanne M. Wilson

Confirmed Participants Include: Robert Moses, Eve Tuck, Christopher Edley J., Sheldon Danzinger, Prudence L. Carter, Particia Baquendano-Lopez

Session Details:

Friday, April 13, 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Grand Ballroom
Session Hashtag: #AERAOpening
Link to Session
Session will be livestreamed


 

AERA Distinguished Lecture: William Trent; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

"Interrogating Segregation, its Complexities and Consequences for Public Education"

Chair: Carla D. O'Connoer

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 12:25 p.m. to 1:55 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton South
Session Hashtag: #AERADistinguished
Link to Session
Session will also be live-streamed


 

Wallace Foundation Distinguished Lecture: Linda Tuhiwai Smith; The University of Waikato

"From Dream to Possibility to Reality - On Becoming and Being an Indigenous Educational Researcher"

Chair: Suzanne M. Wilson

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor - Trianon Ballroom
Session Hashtag: #AERAWallace
Link to Session
Session will also be livestreamed


 

AERA Presidential Address: Deborah Loewenberg Ball, AERA President; University of Michigan

"Just Dreams and Imperatives: The Power of Teaching in the Struggle for Public Education"

AERA President Deborah Loewenberg Ball will give the 2018 Presidential Address, titled “Just Dreams and Imperatives: The Power of Teaching in the Struggle for Public Education.” Teaching has enormous potential for contributing to the development of a just society and supporting the flourishing of historically marginalized groups, but it has instead often reproduced inequality and reified injustice through the discretionary spaces that are inherent to teaching.

Working to make teaching a force that can regularly disrupt the injustices that persist in, and through, teaching practice requires facing and managing tensions between constraint and discretion, as well as between professional boundaries and autonomy. Ball will argue that this demands distinguishing between what has been and what could be, while critically and honestly acknowledging real challenges and dilemmas.

Following the address, Ball will pass the proverbial torch to AERA President-Elect Amy Stuart Wells who will begin her term at the conclusion of the conference.
A celebratory champagne reception will follow the address.

Chairs: Suzanne M. Wilson, Carla D. O'Connor


Session Details:
Sunday, April 15, 4:35 p.m. to 5:50 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Grand Ballroom
Session Hashtag: #AERAPres

Session will also be livestreamed


Awards Luncheon

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Chair: Deborah Loewenberg Ball

Sunday, April 15, 12:25 p.m. to 2:25 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor - Grand Ballroom
Session Hashtag: #AERAAwards

Session will also be live-streamed




Award Lecture Speakers

 

AERA Distinguished Contributions to Research  in Education Award (2017) Address: Henry M. Levin

"Cost-Effectiveness in Education - Mysteries and Revelations."

Chair: Vanessa Siddle Walker

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton South
Session Hashtag: #AERA Contributions
Link to Session

Session will also be live-streamed


AERA E.F. Lindquist Award (2017) Lecture: Hua-Hua Chang 

"From Adaptive Testing to Adaptive Learning"

Modern theories in educational assessment are rapidly transforming testing from unaccommodating ranking measures into flexible and informative tools that can be used to address the compelling needs of various stakeholders in education. The presentation will start with a historical review of some theoretical developments of Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). Then, we will discuss how the cutting-edge testing technology can facilitate individualized learning. Our focus will be on how to build a reliable, and also affordable, adaptive tool for schools to classify students' mastery levels for any given set of cognitive skills that students need to succeed. Results from a number of experiments concerning the potential of using the CAT technology for both diagnostic and summative purposes will be presented.

Chair: Jaekyung Lee

Session Details:


Saturday, April 14, 4:05 p.m. to 5:35 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton North
Link to Session


 

AERA Early Career Award (2017) Lecture: Morgan S. Polikoff

"Reflections on a Quarter Century of Standards-Based Reform"


Standards-based reforms have been a central component of state and federal education policy for over two decades. Starting in the states and spreading to the federal government through No Child Left Behind and the Every Student Succeeds Act, these reforms were intended to strengthen the instructional core of teaching and learning in America's schools. And while they have produced some successes, they have also caused unintended consequences and met growing resistance. This lecture offers a synthesis of a quarter century of research on standards-based reforms and argues that, despite our best efforts, standards have only barely reached inside the classroom door. The talk poses key questions for research and policy as the standards agenda moves forward in the states.

Chair: Carolyn D. Herrington

Session Details:


Sunday, April 15, 2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton South
Link to Session


Distinguished Public Service Award (2017): Michael W. Kirst; Stanford University

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"Public Policy Impact of Education Research : A 54 Year Career Perspective"

Chair: Kent McGuire

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton South
Session Hashtag: #AERA Serve
Link to Session

Session will also be live-streamed


Social Justice in Education Award (2018): Sylvia Hurtado; University of California - Los Angeles

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Chair: Tabbye Maria Chavous

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor - Mercury Ballroom
Session Hashtag: #AERASJ 
Link to Session

Session will also be live-streamed


The Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (FABBS) 2018 Early Career Impact Award: Kathleen H. Corriveau; Boston University

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"How children use questions and explanations to develop critical thinking skills"

How do children learn about the world? Classic research in psychology and education has emphasized how children learn from their own first-hand experience. Yet there are many domains of knowledge where it is difficult – if not impossible – for children to learn from direct experience, such as learning about scientific concepts and historical facts. My research program explores how preschool children determine whether or not an informant is a trustworthy source of information, as well as how children use that information to engage in critical thinking when learn about the world. In this talk, I focus on individual differences in children’s selective learning from adult explanations based on environmental (family socioeconomic status) and cultural influences (parental beliefs about how knowledge is constructed). I discuss implications for both formal and informal educational settings. 

Chair: Amy Stuart Wells

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 12:25 p.m. to 1:55 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton Center
Link to Session


Town Hall Forums


"Me Too” - A Town Hall Meeting: Confronting Sexual Harassment in the Academy and Scholarly Professions


This forum, titled “’Me Too’—A Town Hall Meeting on Transforming a Culture of Sexual Exploitation and Harassment in the Academy and Scholarly Professions,” speaks to contemporary concerns about the ways in which power differentials and dominant social norms and practices have led to sexual harassment, abuse, and intimidation in scientific and academic workplaces.

The town hall will begin with reflections on this topic as well as on the issues involved in identifying inappropriate practices, the responsibility and options of social institutions for addressing sexual misconduct, and strategies that can be invoked to protect individuals and to systematically enable social and structural change. Each invited speaker will talk briefly from the vantage of their observations and expertise, with a moderated open forum across panelists and with the audience.

Chairs: Felice J. Levine, Laura L. Namy

Confirmed Participants Include
: Shirley M. Malcom, Charol Shakeshaft, Shaun Harper, Paula England, and Rhonda Davis

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 4:05 p.m. to 6:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Mercury Ballroom
Link to Session

Session Hashtag: #AERAMeToo

Session will also be live-streamed


Town Hall Forum on Research on Gun Violence and Implications for Schools and Communities


Chairs: Vivian L. Gadsden, Felice J. Levine, 

Confirmed Participants Include: David Adam, Ron Avi Astor, Matthew J. Mayer, Katherine S. Newman, David M. Osher, Pedro A. Noquera

Session Details:

Friday, April 13, 4:30 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton South
Link to Session

Session Hashtag: #AERAGunViolenceRsch

Session will also be live-streamed


Highlighted Presidential Sessions


This sampling of AERA Presidential Sessions provides a sense of the rich and compelling content that will engage Annual Meeting attendees. 

Additional Presidential Sessions are available here.


Keepers of the Dream: A Symposium on the Life and Legacy of Mamie Clark


Drs. Kenneth Bancroft and Mamie Phipps Clark were champions of social justice and public education. The Clarks influenced far more than Brown v. Board of Education decision, they reshaped how we think about urban communities, mental health, and the promise of education. This symposium draws together students, scholars, activists, and practitioners to reflect on the work and legacy of Mamie Phipps and Kenneth B. Clark. Panelists will engage issues that include integration, gender, poverty, school reform, Black and Latinx relations, and comprehensive educational interventions. In addition to honoring the Clarks' contributions, the panelists will speak about how their work continues to influence the quest for equitable educational opportunity.

Chair: R. L'Heureux Lewis-McCoy

Confirmed Participants Include: Terri Nicol Watson, Sonya Douglass Horsford, Carla Shedd, Sonia Lee, Thelma Dye

 

Session Details:

Friday, April 13, 4:05 p.m. to 6:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton South
Link to Session

 


Revisiting the Bilingual Education Act of 1968: The Necessity and Possibilities of Language and Culture in Public Schools


The year 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the Bilingual Education Act (BEA). Passed in 1968, the BEA was initiated in response to the high dropout rate of low-income Spanish speaking students learning English as a second language. A half century later, language minority students still suffer under pervasive inequities in public education that warrant immediate redress. While the number of language minority students has dramatically increased across the United States, the bilingual/multicultural programs needed to build upon their linguistic and cultural repertoires remain absent in most school communities. Drawing upon empirical research and historical, political, theoretical, and practice perspectives, this session provides a comprehensive analysis of the BEA and forwards possibilities for re(imagining) the promise of the Act.

Chair: Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos

Confirmed Participants Include: Cristina Alfaro, Kathy Escamilla, Ofelia Garcia, Maria E. Franquiz, Patricia C. Gándara, Guadalupe Valdes

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 8:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton South
Link to Session

Session will also be live-streamed


Presidential Off-Site Visit: Extending and Deepening the Concept and Practice of Public Education: All Stars Project, Inc.


Join us for a site visit to the national headquarters of All Stars Project, Inc. (ASP), a national nonprofit organization that sponsors outside-of-school youth development programs in six U.S. cities and serves 53,000 young people and their families, primarily in poor communities of color. For over three decades the All Stars has served as a laboratory for developing cultural approaches to youth and community development in an effort to impact on the damaging effects of entrenched and generational poverty. The ASP builds “stages”—both in and out of the theatre—that support participants to play and perform and through those activities, develop, and learn. The visit will include a tour of the performance spaces, classrooms, and shops contained in the 31,000 square-foot facility; observation and participation in on-site All Stars programs; and a group conversation led by Carrie Lobman, Ed.D, and All Stars co-founder Lenora Fulani, Ph.D. with staff and youth and adult participants.

Chair: Carrie L. Lobman

Confirmed Participants Include: Lenora B. Fulani, Bonny L. Gildin, Gloria B. Strickland, Diane Stiles

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 11:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
All Stars Project, Inc., 543 West 42nd Street New York, NY
Link to Session


Realizing the Promise of Education as a Fundamental Right in the United States: Historical and Legal Arguments


In San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a state’s school finance system, which relied primarily on local property taxation, did not violate the Equal Protection Clause. In reaching this decision, the court ruled that education was not a fundamental right under the U.S. Constitution. However, the court suggested that in the future it might consider the possibility that the Constitution guarantees students the fundamental right to receive the level of education necessary for them to function as capable citizens. Recently, students have attempted to resuscitate the claim that education is a fundamental right through litigation. The purpose of this session is to examine the emerging legal arguments that advocates and scholars are advancing for the proposition that education is a fundamental right under the U.S. Constitution.

Chair: Preston C. Green

Confirmed Participants Include: Derek Black, Areto A. Imoukhuede, Christopher M. Span, Michael Rebell, Kathryn Eidman 

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 4:05 p.m. to 6:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Beekman
Link to Session


Radical Dreams and Transformative Praxis: Celebrating 50 Years of Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed


Over the past 50 years, Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed has inspired readers to denounce “banking” education and activate critical consciousness, urging scholars and practitioners to be the change they seek in the world as they teach and learn for democracy and social justice. This session, initiated by the Paulo Freire Special Interest Group, is a two-part immersive experience commemorating the 50th anniversary of Pedagogy of the Oppressed. In Part I, participants will learn about the life and influence of Paulo Freire and Pedagogy of the Oppressed from world-renowned, “first generation” critical pedagogy scholars. In Part II, participants will join break-out sessions where they will engage in dialogue about critical pedagogy as transformative praxis in diverse contexts.

Chairs: Sheila L. Macrine, Tricia M. Kress, Miguel Zavala

Confirmed Participants Include: Inny Accioly, Curtis Acosta, Marissa E. Bellino, Antonia Darder, Christopher Emdin, Teachers College, Nita Freire, Henry A. Giroux, Marcelle M. Haddix, Donaldo Macedo, Peter L. McLaren, Marisol Oriana Ruiz, Celso Sanchez, Ira N. Shor, Nicolas Stahelin

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 4:05 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Millennium Broadway New York Times Square, Eighth Floor - Gallery 8
Link to Session


An Invitation to Teaching Toward Social Justice


While public education’s possibilities inspire us, they are elusive. In NYC, and in cities and communities around the world, practitioners work for social justice. Building knowledge to support the quest for equitable educational opportunity depends on acknowledging and leveraging the expertise of these practitioners. This session aims to create a forum for K-12 practitioners, teacher educators, and other scholars committed to social justice to interact, reflect, and “hope radically and imagine creatively.” Attendees will engage in small group discussions to reflect on common concepts and share stories about teaching to social justice through a critical lens. Attendees will also hear from educators who teach with a social justice lens and have inspired others to do so as well.

Chair: Jose Luis Vilson

Confirmed Participants Include: Awo Okaikor Aryee-Price, Nagla Bedir, Xian Franzinger-Barrett, Rosie Frascella, Annie Tan

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 12:25 p.m. to 1:55 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Beekman
Link to Session


Disrupting Amnesia, Arousing a New Representational Imagination: Disability in the 21st Century


The purpose of this session is to disrupt traditional conceptualizations and studies of disability intersections with other marked categories, such as gender, race, social class, language background, and sexual orientation. An experimental format will be used to engage interdisciplinary scholarship that transcends the study of individual variables (e.g., cognitive factors, poverty status) or institutional factors (e.g., school size, community or school poverty) to more fully understand the inter-workings of individual, social, historical, and social forces and their consequences for educational opportunity. We aim to disrupt the deficit-oriented framing of traditional research with its attendant oversimplification or flattening of disability intersections. The session will advance two interdisciplinary themes recently articulated by Artiles (2017) to inform the future generation of this scholarship, namely the need to rely on a historical epistemology and the importance of advancing a program of scholarship grounded in collages of alternative representations of the problem.

Chairs: Alfredo J. Artiles, Beth A. Ferri

Confirmed Participants Include: Rachel Adams, Susan Burch, Karolyn D. Tyson

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 8:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Regent Parlor
Link to Session


Demanding Our Humanity: Public Education and the Hopes and Dreams of Indigenous Peoples


The 1996 revised Coolangatta Statement on Indigenous Peoples’ Rights in Education declares “We, the Indigenous peoples of the world, assert our inherent right to self-determination in all matters. Self-determination is about making informed choices and decisions and creating appropriate structures for the transmission of culture, knowledge and wisdom for the benefit of each of our respective cultures. Education for our communities and each individual is central to the preservation of our cultures and for the development of the skills and expertise we need in order to be a vital part of the twenty-first century.” This panel of Indigenous scholars will examine the role that public education should play in fulfilling the hopes and dreams of their respective peoples.

Chair: Margaret J. Maaka                                    

Confirmed Participants Include: S Kaleikoa Kaeo, Leonie Pihama, Darryn John Russell, Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy, Lāiana Kanoa-Wong, Huia Tomlins Jahnke, Graham H. Smith

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 8:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton Center
Link to Session


They Tried to Bury Us, They Didn’t Know We Were Seeds: The Fight for Mexican American Studies in Arizona


Tucson Unified School District teachers and students directly impacted by the dismantling of Mexican American studies filed suit on October 18, 2010, and prevailed victoriously against the Arizona Department of Education and the Superintendent of Public Instruction on August 22, 2017. This session elaborates on a precedent-setting case in Acosta et al. v. Huppenthal, et al. In the wake of Judge Tashima’s strident ruling, this case begs us as practitioners, policymakers, and communities to consider an elevated role for ethnic studies in the K-12 curriculum than has heretofore existed. This session brings to light our constitutional rights and responsibilities, together with the power of community and legal advocacy in advancing the educational cause for ethic studies.

Chair: Lorenzo Lopez

Confirmed Participants Include: Luna Barrington, Angela Valenzuela, Alexei Marquez, Nolan L. Cabrera, Rene Martinez, Erica Avila

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 8:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor - Mercury Ballroom
Link to Session


Creating a Culture of Improvement through the Empowerment of Teachers


We live in an age in which many researchers, policymakers, and administrators have too much faith that they can put a number on a teacher’s worth. Yet, qualitative and quantitative data suggest that we can’t simply put numbers on what teachers do. This session involves an extended lesson taught by a nationally-acclaimed National Board certified public school teacher about teacher evaluation, its limitations, and the challenges associated with creating systems of teacher evaluation that are both helpful to and owned by teachers themselves with a focus on race. Working through a series of reflections and scenarios, participants will reflect on what it would take to create a culture of improvement that was designed to leverage teacher agency and expertise, rather than thwart it. There will also be a section for room-wide discussion.

Chair: Suzanne M. Wilson

Confirmed Participants Include: Jose Luis Vilson

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Beekman
Link to Session


Critical Participatory Action Research as Resistance in Revolting Times: Towards Critical Hope and Critical Imagination


This session invites participants on a youth-centered theory-rich justice bus journey to a community space in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Through art and participatory encounter, we will share critical participatory action research projects from the U.S. and New Zealand that frame youth-centered research as resistance and consider the relationship of social science to social movements. Projects will feature "survey justice" with LGBTQGE youth, Maori youth navigating futures in Aotearoa, youth of color re-theorizing community experiences of violence, and re-examining lived experiences of the policies of city-run agencies. We will discuss various forms critical resistance including creating new forms of existence, critical hope, community sovereignty and solidarity, and explorations of the realities and possibilities of our everyday lives. This session is also open to Red Hook community members.

Chairs: Maddy Fox, Michelle Fine

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Red Hook Community Center, Red Hook Community Center
Link to Session


School Segregation, Desegregation, Resegregation, and Integration: Documenting and Troubling a Dream Deferred


Sixty-four years post the Brown vs. Board of Education decision, racially integrated schools remain an elusive dream. This session interrogates the elusiveness and assumptions of this dream by documenting and troubling the persistence, evolution, and effects of school segregation as well as the prospect, character, and (un)realized promises of integrated schools. The session foregrounds three analytical vantage points: (1) macro-level analyses of the documented patterns of school segregation and the processes that enable its persistence and ubiquity; (2) the academic, socio-emotional, identity, and mobility effects that flow from various forms of school segregation (i.e., racial, class, linguistic); and (3) explorations of “integration” that contend with the character and quality of inclusion, including respect for diverse learners and equitable participation.

Chairs: Amy Stuart Wells, Mitchell J. Chang

Confirmed Participants Include: Gary A. Orfield, John B. Diamond, Amanda E. Lewis, Russell W. Rumberger

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 8:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton South
Link to Session

Session will also be live-streamed


Ocean Hill-Brownsville and Its Relevance Today: The 50th Anniversary of New York City’s Movement for Community Control


Through film, performance, and dialogue, this session will explore the historical significance of New York City’s community control movement in Harlem, East Harlem, Ocean-Hill Brownville, Bedford Stuyvesant, the Lower East Side, and the South Bronx in the 1960s. Scholars and community activists from the past and present will explore the long arc of intersectionality in New York City’s grassroots organizing for educational equity and justice and the city, union, and school system responses. Interwoven throughout will be stories from the classroom, school, district, and neighborhoods touched by the community control movement and their relevance to organizing today.

Chairs: Stephen Brier, Heather Lewis

Confirmed Participants Include: Natasha Capers, Paul
Chandler, Anna-Maria Correa, Sonia Cott, Cleaster Cotton,
Sulfia DeSilva, Monifa Edwards, and Veronica Gee, Andrew Greene, Charles
Isaacs, Sonia Lee, Rhody McCoy, Rev. C. Herbert Oliver, Daniel
Perlstein, Zakiyah Shaakir-Ansari, Clarence Taylor, Baruch College

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 10:35 a.m. to 1:55 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor - Grand Ballroom Suite-West Ballroom
Link to Session


Reimagining Education for the Changing Public: From Research to Promising Pedagogy in Racially Diverse Schools


This session foregrounds the research and theory behind professional development for educators working in racially and ethnically diverse schools. Based on the knowledge base informing a summer institute designed by faculty and graduate students at one college of education, this session will inspire other educational researchers who focus on issues of race, pedagogy, and inequality to translate their theory into practice and provide the critical frameworks and analysis to foster best practices in racially and culturally diverse schools. The presenters are organized according to the four research-based themes of the summer institute: Why Reimagining?; Racial and Cultural Literacy; Equity Pedagogy; and Culturally Sustaining Leadership.

Chair: Susan Fuhrman

Confirmed Participants Include: Django Paris, Vanessa Siddle-Walker, Felicia Moore Mensah, Amy Stuart Wells, Jamila Lyiscot, Yolanda Sealy-Ruiz, Detra Price-Dennis, Laura Smith, Christopher Emdin, Michelle G. Knight-Manuel, Mariana Souto-Manning, Erica Walker, Sonya Douglass Horsford, Mark Anthony Gooden, Jeff Young

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 4:05 p.m. to 6:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Sutton South
Link to Session


The Role of Education Researchers in an Era of Fake News


In recent times, we have witnessed challenges by federal, state, and local elected officials to the fundamental principles and values of higher education in the United States. Particularly troubling are the disregard and politicization of facts, data, research, and science and mischaracterizations of the meaning and importance of academic freedom. This presidential session seeks to advance productive and interactive dialogue about how we, as individuals and a collective, can ensure the integrity of knowledge now and into the future and effectively respond to challenges to facts, data, research, and science. Dialogue will focus on the role of individual educational researchers and AERA, as an association and collective, in the production, dissemination, and use of research.

Chair: Laura W. Perna

Confirmed Participants Include: Ana M. Martínez Alemán, Prudence L. Carter, Jeffrey R. Henig, Demetri L. Morgan, Antar A. Tichavakunda, and William G. Tierney 

Read participant statements

Session Details:

Tuesday, April 17, 8:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor - Beekman
Link to Session


Highlighted Research Science and Policy Forum Sessions


Additional Research and Science Policy Forum Sessions can be found here.


Connecting Early Education and Early Childhood Development


Chair: Vivian L. Gadsden

Confirmed Participants Include: Steven Barnett, Margaret R. Burchinal, Eugene E. Garcia, Mary Elizabeth (Beth) Graue, Sharon Ryan

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 8:45 a.m. to 10:05 a.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room West
Link to Session


Connecting Data Sharing to Article Publishing - How to Maximize the Impact of Your Research


Chair: Felice J. Levine

Confirmed Participants Include: Jason A. Grissom, Margaret Levenstein, Arthur (Skip) Lupia, Robert Ochsendorf, Mark Warschauer

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton North
Link to Session

Perspectives and Aspirations of Foundation Leaders: A Conversation on Advancing Education Research


Chair: Jeannie Oakes

Confirmed Participants Include: Adam Gamoran, Jacqueline Jones, Na'ilah Suad Nasir, Kent McGuire

Session Details:

Sunday, April 15, 10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Nassau Room East
Link to Session


Advocating for the Right to Science and Evidence-Based Policy Making in Education


Chair: Lori Diane Hill

Confirmed Participants Include: James A. Banks, Gustavo E. Fischman, Andrew Rosenberg, Caroline Weinberg

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Madison
Link to Session

Revisiting the IES/NSF Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development After Five Years (2013-2018)


The Institute of Education Sciences and the National Science Foundation released the Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development in August of 2013. The Guidelines seek to provide a broad framework to clarify research types and provide basic guidance about the purpose, justification, design features, and expected outcomes from various research types. The Guidelines are intended to be a “living document” to be adapted by agencies or divisions within agencies in response to needs and opportunities. Over time, the Guidelines may be elaborated or rearranged according to agency focus and assessments of the needs of education researchers and practitioners. Five years later, this panel of federal agency representatives and education researchers reflect on the Guidelines, their usefulness for the field of education research, relative areas of importance, and potential areas for improvement or revision in light of the current landscape of education research.

Chairs: Sarah-Kay McDonald, Joan McLaughlin

Confirmed Participants Include: Larry V. Hedges, Rebecca A. Maynard

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 10:35 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room West
Link to Session


The Rise of Nonprofit Education Journalism and What It Means for Education Researchers


As the news media industry has undergone profound change, a positive development amid the disruption has been the growth in philanthropy-supported news outlets, including those that specialize in education coverage. This session will focus on how these news providers differ from traditional outlets in their coverage of education and education research and data; and how they complement, supplement, and influence news coverage nationally and locally. Panelists will also discuss the new opportunities that these outlets provide education researchers and best practices for scholars who want to communicate their work through media coverage.

Chair: Sarah Dockery Sparks
Confirmed Participants Include: Matt Barnum, Sarah Carr, Sarah Garland, Jeffrey R. Henig

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 12:25 p.m. to 1:55 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton South
Link to Session

Session will also be live-streamed


Advancing and Benefiting from Education Research in Confrontational and Tumultuous Times


Around the proverbial “water cooler” in whatever the workplace, the social group, or the community or family setting, there is uncertainty about what we hear from public officials and policy leaders and how best to ensure that truths, facts, observations, and data matter. We are living in a time when we see that some publics are increasingly valuing science to support open discourse and sound decision making. Yet, it is also a period when fields of science and scholarship are more observably being limited, denied, or under attack and where scholars who in particular raise challenging questions may experience efforts to delegitimize their work.

Chairs: Vivian L. Gadsden, Felice J. Levine

Confirmed Participants Include: Deborah Loewenberg Ball, James A. Banks, Joyce E. King, William F. Tate, William G. Tierney

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 2:15 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton North
Link to Session


Reinventing 21st Century Graduate Education for Education Research and All Science Fields


Chair: Susan Fuhrman

Confirmed Participants Include: Julia Davis Kent, Amy Stephens, Layne Scherer, Mia Tuan

Session Details:

Monday, April 16, 2:15 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Murray Hill Room West
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Memorial Sessions


Each year at the Annual Meeting AERA acknowledges those members who have died in the previous year. One form of acknowledgement is the scroll of deceased members shown at the Annual Awards Luncheon. Another is the recognition provided at business meetings of the individual SIGs and Divisions. In addition, a number of sessions included in the program are designed to commemorate the work of deceased scholars.

This year there are three commemorative sessions planned for the Annual Meeting. Full details are available in the online program.


Commemorating Brian V. Street—Conversations About His Life and Work


In 1984, Brian Street's Literacy in Theory and Practice, for the first time defined literacy as a social practice whose nature was essential ideological. he was among the early scholars to bring together anthropology and education in the study of literacy practices in and outside of schools.

Chairs: David M. Bloome

Confirmed Participants Include: David Barton, Huili Hong, Jennier Rowsell, Gilcinei Carvalho

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 8:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
New York Marriott Marquis, 5th floor, Julliard Room
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Culture, Context, and Meaning: Honoring Marty Maehr’s Contributions to the Field of Achievement Motivation 


The groundbreaking scholarship of Martin L. Maehr, who passed away on January 2017, has been a critical voice underpinning contemporary advances in the field of achievement motivation. This commemoration session brings together Marty’s students and colleagues to share and discuss his forward theoretical thinking and empirical work on the roles of culture, context, and meaning-making in motivation in educational settings. The audience will hear reflections on Marty’s challenges to the dominant McClelland-Atkinson achievement motive paradigm of the 1960s, the cross-cultural origins of his important contribution to the foundation of achievement goal theory, and the school-wide intervention project that still constitutes one of the most ambitious attempts to change a school’s motivational culture.

Chair: Stuart A Karabenick

Confirmed Participants Include: Dennis M. McInerney, Juliane Turner

Session Details:

Saturday, April 14, 4:05 p.m. to 6:05 p.m.
Millennium Broadway, Fifth Floor, Room 5.08
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In Commemoration of Robert Tinker: Deeply Digital Learning in STEM 


Chairs: Chad Dorsey, Sherry H. Hsi

Confirmed Participants Include: Janet L. Kolodner, Marcia Linn

Session Details:

Tuesday, April 17, 8:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
Sheraton New York Times Square, 2nd floor, Central Park East Room
Link to Session

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Town Hall Forums

“Me Too” Town Hall Meeting: Confronting Sexual Harassment in the Academy and Scholarly Professions

 

This forum, titled “’Me Too’—A Town Hall Meeting on Transforming a Culture of Sexual Exploitation and Harassment in the Academy and Scholarly Professions,” speaks to contemporary concerns about the ways in which power differentials and dominant social norms and practices have led to sexual harassment, abuse, and intimidation in scientific and academic workplaces.

The town hall will begin with reflections on this topic as well as on the issues involved in identifying inappropriate practices, the responsibility and options of social institutions for addressing sexual misconduct, and strategies that can be invoked to protect individuals and to systematically enable social and structural change. Each invited speaker will talk briefly from the vantage of their observations and expertise, with a moderated open forum across panelists and with the audience.

Chairs: Felice J. Levine, Laura L. Namy

Confirmed Participants Include: Shirley M. Malcom, Charol Shakeshaft, Shaun Harper, Paula England, and Rhonda Davis.

Session Details:
Saturday, April 14, 4:05 p.m. to 6:05 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Third Floor, Mercury Ballroom
Link to Session


Town Hall Forum on Research on Gun Violence and Implications for Schools and Communities


ChairsVivian L. Gadsden, University of PennsylvaniaFelice J. Levine, 

Confirmed Participants IncludeDavid Adam, Ron Avi Astor, Matthew J. Mayer, Katherine S. Newman, David M. Osher

Session Details:
Friday, April 13, 4:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.
New York Hilton Midtown, Second Floor, Sutton South
Link to Session





 
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