Indigenous Peoples of the Americas SIG 48
 
Message from SIG Chair
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Welcome to the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas (IPA) Special Interest Group (SIG). The IPA SIG currently has approximately 208 voting members, and represents AERA members from a number of different research interests and tribal/Indigenous community contexts, both national and international.  For many years the IPA SIG has served as a gathering space at AERA to support emergent scholars interested in conducting Indigenous research in education, as well as a space in which returning scholars connect and share new accomplishments. A few and continued initiatives are:

  • Development of an AERA program that reflects diverse interests of the membership -- drawing upon multiple contexts in which Indigenous research is conducted
  • Revision of the IPA SIG By Laws
  • Submission of IPA SIG BY Laws for review by AERA governance
  • Development of an election process that both honors Indigenous protocols and relationships, while reaching all members toward full engagement in SIG discussion and decision making
  • Stewarding new proposed AERA Award to honor graduate students (still under review by AERA)

At our annual business meeting, we celebrated the 2016 Bobby Wright Awardee, Dr. Onowa McIvor, Assistant Professor and Director, Indigenous Education, University of Victoria.  Dr. McIvor earned a BA in Psychology and Women’s Studies (University of Victoria), an MA in Child and Youth Care (University of Victoria) and a PhD in Language and Literacy (University of British Columbia).  She is a Cree scholar who was born and raised in Indigenous community, her research goals are in service of Indigenous community, and her approaches to research and knowledge mobilization are guided by the value of ‘doing it in a good way’ that she learned at the foot of her Elders. 

The IPA SIG congratulates Dr. McIvor, this year’s Bobby Wright Award recipient.

Here is a link at which you may see and hear her words of appreciation and a brief overview of her research focus!!  https://youtu.be/bkmTH-SHbv0

 
 
SIG Purpose
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"The purposes of the IPA SIG are to mentor, support and increase exchange of knowledge uncovering Indigenous ways of knowing and doing in order to address issues surrounding Indigenous research methodologies, analyses, and reporting of educational issues impacting Indigenous peoples and communities."

Please view the Bylaws link to see the proposed purposes of the SIG.  As of 2016, these Bylaws are still under consideration and revision.  In 2016-15, a committee will be assembled to continue to work on these documents.

SIG Officers: 2015-2016:  In 2015, the SIG's in-person elections were determined to be invalid and therefore the following incoming SIG officers served the roles entirely without support of Elect officer positions:

Congratulations to our 2018 IPA SIG Officers:

Heather Shotton, Chair

Hollie Kulago, Secretary/Treasurer

Amanda Tachine, Program Co-chair

Stephanie Masta, Program Co-chair

Danielle Lansing, TCU Representative

Amanda LeClair-Diaz, Graduate Student Representative























 
 
Who We Are
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Profile of Indigenous Peoples of the Americas SIG #48 Members

 

Division Officers

Heather Shotton, Chair

Heather Shotton

Heather Shotton, Ph.D. is a citizen of the Wichita & Affiliated Tribes, and is also of Kiowa and Cheyenne descent.  She currently serves as an Associate Professor in Native American Studies at the University of Oklahoma.  She received her doctorate in Adult and Higher Education from the University of Oklahoma in 2008. Dr. Shotton’s research focuses on Indigenous students in higher education and Indigenous women, particularly in the areas of leadership and Indigenous women in academia. She served as a co-editor for the book, Beyond the Asterisk:  Understanding Native Students in Higher Education (Stylus), which addresses strategies for serving Native college students and is a co-editor for the forthcoming book, Reclaiming Indigenous Research in Higher Education (Rutgers University Press).  She has been faculty at OU for nine years, prior to returning to OU she served as Assistant Director of Multicultural Student Affairs at Oklahoma City University.  She has spent her career serving students both in and out of the classroom.  Dr. Shotton is the past president for the National Indian Education Association and was recently named the NIEA Educator of the Year. She is a strong advocate for Native education and serves Native students and communities on a national and local level. She lives in Norman with her partner John Shotton, and their two daughters Sloan and Sophie.

Unfillled, Chair-elect

Hollie Kulago, Secretary-Treasurer

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Dr. Hollie Anderson Kulago is Diné and originally from Sawmill, AZ. She is Tsénahabiłnii and born for Hashdl’ishnii. Her chéí is Bilágaana and her nalí is Ta’néézsahnii. She has been a member of the IPA SIG for 9 years. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Education and teaches in the Childhood Education program at Elmira College in Elmira, NY. Her scholarship has a focus on Indigenous methodologies, namely, identifying and centering Indigenous philosophies of community within curriculum, pedagogy, and family-school-community partnerships. Additionally, she is the Program Director for the Empowering Relationships Project at Elmira College which has the goals to cultivate Indigenous teacher education students to become teachers who will center indigenous knowledge and empower relationships in their practice. She considers her greatest accomplishment thus far as being a mother of two children (3 yrs and 13yrs). 

Amanda Tachine, Program Co-Chair A

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Dr. Amanda R. Tachine is Navajo from Ganado, Arizona. She is Náneesht’ézhí Táchii’nii (Zuni Red Running into Water clan) born for Tl’izilani (Many Goats clan). Her maternal grandfather’s clan is Tábaahí (Water’s Edge) and her paternal grandfather’s clan is Ashiihi (Salt). She is a postdoctoral scholar at Arizona State University’s Center for Indian Education where she advances ideas and strategies to increase Native college student success.

Stephanie Masta Co-Chair B

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Dr. Stephanie Masta (Sault Ste Marie, Chippewa) is an assistant professor in the College of Education at Purdue University. Her research interests include the experiences of Indigenous students in P-20 schools and the role of colonialism in academic environments. She also uses critical qualitative and Indigenous methodologies in her work. When not doing research, Stephanie likes to run long distances.

Amanda LeClair-Diaz, Graduate Student Representative

ALD 2017

Amanda LeClair-Diaz (Eastern Shoshone/Northern Arapaho) is originally from Ft. Washakie, which is located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. She is a fourth-year doctoral student in theTeaching, Learning,and Sociocultural Studies Department at the University of Arizona. Amanda's major is Indigenous Education, and her minor is Teaching and Teacher Education. While in her PhD program, Amanda has been working toward reclaiming Sosoni.  She was a student in the AILDI program in the summer of 2015 and the summer of 2017. Once Amanda obtains her PhD, she hopes to become a professor who works with pre-service educators and Native communities.

Danielle Lansing, Tribal College Representative

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Dr. Danielle Lansing is a faculty member at Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) within the Early Childhood Education (ECE) Program.  She has worked at SIPI since June 2012.  Prior to entering higher education, she served as an educator for 15 years.  She has taught in Bureau of Indian Education and tribal contract schools in New Mexico and Arizona with various tribes such as the Navajo Nation, Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community and the Pueblo of Zia. 

Danielle has a Bachelors of Science in Elementary Education and Masters of Arts in Education Administration from the University of New Mexico.  Danielle also obtained a Masters degree in Early Childhood Risk and Prevention from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education.  In 2011 Danielle earned a Doctorate in Education from Arizona State University where she studied Educational Administration and Supervision.  Her dissertation study focused on the impact of past educational experiences on educational decision making within a rural Navajo community.

Dr. Lansing’s research interests include Native teacher education; community based participatory research, and Indigenous research methodologies.  Danielle’s research experience includes qualitative research methodologies including Phenomenological studies and grounded theory.

Dr. Lansing has served as the Principal Investigator and Project Director for the Wakanyeja “Sacred Little Ones” Tribal College Readiness and Success by Third Grade Initiative (2012-2015) and is currently the Project Director and Principal Investigator for SIPI’s Restorative Teachings Initiative.  Through these initiatives, Dr. Lansing has developed innovative practices and partnerships on behalf of SIPI’s ECE program.

Dr. Lansing has published works in the Journal of Indian Education.  Recently, Dr. Lansing contributed a chapter in Teacher Education across Minority Serving Institutions: Programs, Policies, and Social Justice.  Dr. Lansing’s goal is to serve as a voice for Tribal Colleges and Universities with regard to research and Indigenous Education.

Dr. Lansing is an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation.  She credits her family’s educational experience as the motivation for her continued interest and commitment to Indian Education.

TBA, Awards Committee Chair

TBD, Pre-Conference Co-Planner

TBD, Pre-Conference Co-Planner




Committees

Pre-Conference Planning Committee

Awards Committee

Bylaws Committee

Elections Committee

Graduate Student Memorial Award Committee



Structure & Government

 
 
Key Initiatives
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Awards
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See All Awards>>



The IPA SIG currently recognizes two awards:

G. Mike Charleston Award (Distinguished Service)



Bobby Wright Award (Early Career Award)

In 2017, we hope to have a new proposed award approved:



Danielle Terrance Award (Graduate Student Award)

2016 AERA Indigenous Peoples of the Americas Special Interest Group (IPA SIG) Award Update 

The IPA SIG gives two awards:  the Bobby Wright Award, given in years ending in an even number; the Mike Charleston Award in odd numbered years. Nominations are requested via the IPA listserv in the fall of each year.  Please consider nominating a colleague for the 2017 Mike Charleston Award, which recognizes a scholar whose professional career has been substantially devoted to the study of Indigenous education, and who has significantly advanced the field through extraordinary leadership, scholarship, professional practice, and service to Indigenous communities.  

This year, the IPA SIG is pleased to present the 2016 Bobby Wright Award for Early Career Contributions to Research in Indigenous Education.  This award honors the early career scholar-researcher Bobby Wright by recognizing a scholar in the early stages of her/his research career (ABD up to two years post-tenure) who has developed a significant program of research, scholarship, professional practice, and service to Indigenous Peoples and communities and in advancing the study of Indigenous education.   

Eight members of the Indigenous Peoples of the America’s SIG volunteered to serve on the Award Committee this year.  Of those eight, three were randomly selected to read and rate nomination materials and recommend the award nominee to the IPA Chair.  While keeping the actual reviewers confidential, it is important to thank the entire group of eight who served on the committee.  They were readily available via email and answered several questions, giving clear guidance and advice.    

Dr. Anya Dozier Enos, Awards Committee Chair

Dr. Damara Goff Paris 

Dr. Cheryl Stephens  

Dr. Patricia Maringi G. Johnston 

Dr. Stephanie M. Zywicki 

Dr. Ethan Yazzie-Mintz 

Dr. Jennifer McCann  

Dr. Donna R. La Placa Patterson 

Dr. Dolores Calderon 

The 2016 Bobby Wright Awardee is Dr. Onowa McIvor, Assistant Professor and Director, Indigenous Education, University of Victoria.  Dr. McIvor earned a BA in Psychology and Women’s Studies (University of Victoria), an MA in Child and Youth Care (University of Victoria) and a PhD in Language and Literacy (University of British Columbia).  She is a Cree scholar who was born and raised in Indigenous community, her research goals are in service of Indigenous community, and her approaches to research and knowledge mobilization are guided by the value of ‘doing it in a good way’ that she learned at the foot of her Elders. 

The IPA SIG congratulates Dr. McIvor, this year’s Bobby Wright Award recipient.

Here is a link at which you may see and hear her words of appreciation and a brief overview of her research focus!!  https://youtu.be/bkmTH-SHbv0

 


 

 
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