2014 Professional Development and Training Courses
>
2014 Professional Development and Training Courses
 
Professional Development and Training Courses for 2014 Annual Meeting
Print

Courses Start April 2, 2014

The Professional Development and Training Committee has planned a rich program of extended and mini-courses for the 2014 AERA Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. The program was crafted based on consideration of more than 50 submissions and a competitive review process. Professional development courses provide training in specific research methods and skills, cover significant research issues in related disciplines, emphasize specialized areas, address professional development issues, focus on research for the improvement of practice, or examine recent methodological and substantive developments in education research.

The extended courses begin on Wednesday, April 2, one day before the start of the Annual Meeting. The mini-courses will be held Friday through Sunday, April 4–6. Potential participants can register for Professional Development and Training Courses by logging into and updating their 2014 AERA Annual Meeting registration. Direct questions about the professional development and training courses to profdevel@aera.net.

Extended Courses

PDC01: An Introduction Hierarchical Linear Modeling for Educational Researchers

Instructors:     Ann A. O'Connell, The Ohio State University; D. Betsy McCoach, University of Connecticut
Date:               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $115
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 115A

This course will introduce the fundamentals of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), focusing on fundamental concepts and practical applications with minimal emphasis on statistical theory. In addition to presenting a conceptual overview of HLM, the instructors will utilize a school-based example to demonstrate the application of HLM within an organizational framework.  Participants will learn how to analyze 2-level data using HLMv7 and interpret the results of the analyses. Instruction will consist of lecture, demonstrations of the software, and hands-on data analysis activities.  Participants should bring a laptop equipped with the free student version of HLMv7 (from www.ssicentral.com) and SPSS or another data manipulation software. The course example data will run on the student version of HLM. (Please note that there is no MAC version of the HLM software program.)


PDC02: Analyzing International Large-Scale Assessment Data with R

Instructors:     Daniel H. Caro, University of Oxford; Christian Bokhove, University of Southampton
Date:               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $125
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 115B

The course will train participants how to analyze data from international assessments (PISA, TIMSS, and PIRLS) using R. Lectures will briefly introduce R and explain the challenges associated with the analysis of international assessment data (i.e., plausible values, replicate weights). Hands-on exercises will demonstrate how to reproduce main results in international assessment reports with the R package 'intsvy'. This course is for researchers interested in international assessments and R who are familiar with script language concepts (e.g., for, if, else) and understand statistical concepts such as inference, regression, probability, and sampling weights. Participants are required to bring laptop computers with R and R-Studio installed.


PDC03: Analyzing Large Scale Assessment Data with Plausible Values: Hands-on Practice Approach with the National Assessment of Educational Progress Sample Data File, Primer Organizational Learning

Instructors:     Emmanuel Sikali, U.S. Department of Education; Young Yee Kim, American Institutes for Research
Date:
               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $125
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 115C

The purpose of this course is to provide emerging and continuing researchers with the practical knowledge and tools to analyze National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a common metric for all states and selected urban districts NAEP data. This course consists of two parts: 1) introduction of psychometric and sampling design of NAEP and 2) hands-on practice of NAEP data with plausible values using an NAEP sample data file, Primer. Instructors will address challenges associated with NAEP’s unique data structure such as multiple plausible values instead of one scale score. Participants need to bring a laptop with the Windows and SPSS installed.


PDC04: Conducting Qualitative Research that Includes Online Spaces: An Interactive Course

Instructors:     Sandra Schamroth Abrams, Saint John's University; Hannah R Gerber, Sam Houston State University;  Jayne C. Lammers, University of Rochester; Alecia Marie Magnifico, University of New Hampshire; Jen Scott Curwood, The University of Sydney
Date:               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $125
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 119A

This course is designed for those familiar with qualitative research methods--from graduate students to advanced researchers--and aims to explore contemporary data collection and triangulation in online spaces. The course objectives include collecting and analyzing data from digital sources, such as videogame-related texts, blogs, social networking sites, and instant messages. Hands-on exercises will examine how qualitative research methodologies can inform researchers' understanding of learning in formal and informal online spaces, which include in-school and out-of-school environments. Participants should bring their own laptop for activities and will be asked to establish free accounts with data and social networking and management sites/programs.


PDC05: Eye Tracking - Innovation in Educational Research and Assessment

Instructors:     Anita M. Sands, Educational Testing Service; Gary Feng, Educational Testing Service
Date:               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $125 
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 117
 
This course will introduce knowledge and skills to use eye tracking technology to design and conduct education research. Hands-on work will follow an overview of the eye tracking technology. No special equipment or previous knowledge of eye tracking is necessary; however, participants should develop a straightforward research question to examine during the session. This research question could address education issues such as reading processes or usability of educational software. Participants will receive a software library featuring open-source eye tracking solutions for capturing and analyzing data, which they can use and further develop for use with their eye tracking hardware system. Laptops are required.


PDC06: Growth Mixture Modeling for Educational Researchers

Instructors:     Jeffrey R. Harring, University of Maryland, College Park
Date:               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $115
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 118A

This course builds on participants’ introductory knowledge of structural equation modeling and latent growth modeling to incorporate finite mixture modeling targeting longitudinal methods for both linear and nonlinear change. The instructors will introduce the basics of growth mixture modeling, focusing on fundamental concepts and practical applications with minimal emphasis on statistical theory. In addition to presenting a conceptual overview of growth mixture models, educational data will be used throughout to demonstrate the application of growth mixture models with primary focus on developing a principled analytic framework.


PDC07: Introduction to Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Instructors:     Therese D. Pigott, Loyola University Chicago; Joshua R. Polanin, Loyola University Chicago; Ryan Williams, The University of Memphis
Date:               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $125
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 118B

This course will introduce the basics of systematic review and meta-analysis.  Topics covered include the development of a research question, literature research, evaluating and coding studies, meta-analysis techniques, and interpretation of results for policymakers and researchers. The course will include lecture, hands-on exercises, and individual consultation.  The target audience includes both those new to systematic review and meta-analysis as well as those currently conducting a review.  If there is participant interest, those currently conducting a review will participate in more advanced training in meta-analysis as well as individual consultation with the instructors.  Students are required to bring a laptop computer.


PDC08: Narrative Inquiry in Education Research

Instructors:     Colette Daiute, The Graduate Center - CUNY; Philip Kreniske, The Graduate Center (CUNY)
Date:               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $115
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 118C

Narrative inquiry in education research builds on theory and practice defining narrating as a social process.  The course format includes presentations and hands-on modules for narrative research design and narrative analysis in studies of teaching and learning sensitive to diversity, social change, and other issues.  Course participants are graduate students, early career scholars, and advanced researchers becoming familiar with narrative inquiry.  Course objectives include to present principles of narrative inquiry, to illustrate these principles in prior published research, and to practice applying the principles in new studies. Potential assignments include doing values analysis and significance analysis to examine narrative data provided by the instructors or data brought by course participants.  No equipment or prior experience with narrative analysis is required.

PDC09: Analysis Using Sampling Weights and Appropriate Standard Error Estimation with NCES Data 

Instructor:     Laura M. Stapleton, University of Maryland, College Park
Date:               Wednesday, April 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $115
Location:        Convention Center, 100 Level - 116   

This course will cover weighting and sampling design issues in several National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) large-scale datasets (e.g., ELS, ECLS-K, PIRLS, and SASS), focusing on the specialized statistical procedures required to analyze the datasets. This course will enable participants to: explain typical sampling designs used in data collection; describe differences among the many weights available (e.g., sampling weights, panel weights, replicate weights); and undertake basic statistical analysis. The course will focus on obtaining unbiased parameter estimates and standard errors by using sampling weights and specialized variance estimation techniques including both linearization and replication. Lecture material will be woven into hands-on exercises throughout the course. Participants should bring their own laptop with SPSS (including the “Complex Samples” module) or SAS, as well as the free Mplus demo.   

Mini Courses

PDC10: Applied Autoethnography: Process, Product & Innovation for Educational Practice and Policy

Instructors:     Sherick A. Hughes, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; Nitasha M. Clark, Educational Specialties; Julie L. Pennington, University of Nevada - Reno
Date:               Friday, April 4, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon D

The purpose of this course is to advise graduate students, prospective and novice university professors about applying critical autoethnography to inform educational policy and practice (via lecture, hands on exercises and "critical friend" team work). Instead of ignoring assumptions or viewing them as limitations, critical autoethnography allows educational researchers to unravel and develop innovative solutions. Applying critical autoethnography is a process involving (1) six key decisions, (2) epistemologies of practice/critical reflexive action research, (3) integrating autoethnography into research and teaching and (4) publishing defensible autoethnographies in reputable journals. Participants will learn the process of adding critical autoethnography as an alternative tool in their methodological toolkits. Neither prerequisite skills nor prior knowledge are necessary. Laptops are encouraged.

PDC11: PISA and Beyond: Analysis of International Data from PISA Using Multiple Tools and Incorporating Additional Country-Level Data

Instructors:     David C. Miller, American Institutes for Research; Anindita Sen, American Institutes for Research; Bitnara Jasmine Park, University of Oregon; Ngaire Honey, Vanderbilt University;  Ariana L. Harner, American Institutes for Research; Laura Kolind Warren, American Institutes for Research
Date:               Friday, April 4, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon F

This course will teach data users how to access resources and analyze assessment and contextual data from The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). Multiple tools to assist participants with varying research skills and interests will be presented, including many that are free and publicly available. Participants will be shown how PISA data can be used in conjunction with or linked to additional country-level data. The course will focus on newly released data from PISA 2012 particularly the inclusion of computer-based assessments in mathematics literacy, reading literacy, and general problem solving, as well as an assessment of students' financial literacy. The PISA 2012 includes data from 64 countries/economies. It is recommended that participants bring a laptop to follow along with the demonstrations and participate in hands-on exercises. Note: Participants may be interested in PDC13: Advanced Analysis using International Large Scale Assessment Databases (TIMSS, PIRLS and PISA) which focuses mostly on preparing PISA, TIMSS and PIRLS data files and the sampling and testing design of these datasets.  


PDC12: Sensitivity Analysis: Quantifying the Discourse About Causal Inference

Instructors:     Kenneth Frank, Michigan State University, Yun-jia Lo, Michigan State University, Michael Seltzer, University of California, Los Angeles, Min Sun, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Yuqing Liu, University of Pennsylvania, Jihyun Kim, Michigan State University, I-Chien Chen, Michigan State University
Date:               Friday, April 4, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon E

Course will be available through the AERA-Virtual Research Learning Center. Participants will learn how to quantify concerns about causal inferences due to unobserved variables or populations.  Participants will also learn how to calculate the correlations associated with an unobserved confounding variable or the amount of one’s sample that would have to be replaced to invalidate an inference.  The instructors will present a general framework for characterizing the robustness of inferences from randomized experiments or observational studies.  Calculations for bivariate and multivariate analysis will be presented in SPSS, SAS, and Stata, with an excel spreadsheet for other applications. Additional topics include a typology of thresholds for making inferences, null hypotheses of non-zero effects, evaluating thresholds relative to characteristics of observed variables or populations, and extensions to non-linear models.  The format will be a mixture of presentation, individual exploration, and group work. The course is aimed at graduate students and professors who are comfortable with basic regression and multiple regression. Participants should bring their own laptop, or be willing to work with another student who has a laptop. Participants may bring an example of an inference from a published study or their own work, as well as data analyses they are currently conducting.


PDC13: Advanced Analysis using International Large Scale Assessment Databases (TIMSS, PIRLS and PISA)

Instructors:     Eugenio Gonzalez, ETS; Andres Sandoval-Hernandez, International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement
Date:               Friday, April 4, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon C

This course covers how to download and prepare the public use data files from TIMSS, PIRLS and PISA and conduct basic and advanced statistical analysis. It will also cover the statistical complexities and techniques used in these studies and their implications for analysis through. a combination of lectures and hands on exercises. By the end of the course participants will be able to prepare the data files for advanced statistical analysis and conduct basic and some advanced analysis using customized software provided during the workshop.  Participants need  a laptop computer with Windows and SPSS installed and knowledge of basic and intermediate statistics.  Data files and demonstration software to use the data will be distributed during the course. Note: Participants may be interested in PDC11: PISA and Beyond: Analysis of International Data from PISA Using Multiple Tools and Incorporating Additional Country-Level Data which focuses on the accessing the PISA data  and manipulating the web based data tools. PDC13 is an-advanced level course.


PDC14: Improving Generalizations from Experiments: New methods

Instructors:     Larry V. Hedges, Northwestern University; Elizabeth Tipton, Teachers College, Columbia University
Date:               Friday, April 4, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon E

Course will be available through the AERA-Virtual Research Learning Center. The course is aimed at researchers of all levels who are interested in either making generalizations from large-scale experiments that have been completed or planning to conduct large-scale experiments. The course focuses on studies using a cluster randomized or multi-site design including many schools or school districts. The instructors will introduce methods for improving the external validity of these experiments. The course begins with an overview of the larger issues of generalization, and then provides participants with tools to implement new methods for improving generalizations in their own experimental work. This includes tools for developing a strategic recruitment plan and for improving estimates of the average treatment effect. Participants should be familiar with large-scale experiments and should bring a laptop.


PDC15: Using NAEP Data on the Web for Educational Policy Research

Instructors:     Debra Kline, Educational Testing Service; Edward M. Kulick, ETS; Emmanuel Sikali, U.S. Department of Education
Date:               Friday, April 4, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon F

This course is for researchers interested in exploring National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) data through the NAEP Data Explorer web tool.  Participants will be guided through an examination of the data, focusing on: 1) student, teacher, and school variables; 2) relationships between student performance and characteristics of students, their teachers and their schools; and 3) using NAEP data to supplement other educational research.  Participants will have the opportunity to work independently and share their findings with the group.  The course will highlight 2013 NAEP math and reading data.  The course provides hands-on learning and active participation.  A laptop or tablet computer with internet access is needed.


PDC16: Writing an Application for an IES Grant: A Workshop

Instructors:     Allen Ruby, National Center for Education Research, Institute of Education Sciences; Meredith Larson, National Center for Education Research, Institute of Education Sciences
Date:               Friday, April 4, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Fee:                 This course is by application only. The PDC16: Writing an Application for an IES Grant: A Workshop Application deadline (February 18, 2014) has passed. We are no longer accepting applications at this time.
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon B

This course will provide instruction on writing a successful application to the Institute of Education Sciences’ Education Research Grants Program (84.305A) and Special Education Research Grants Program (84.324A).  The course will focus on: 1) the research topics, 2) the research goal structure, and 3) the four sections of the Research Narrative (Significance, Research Plan, Personnel, and Resources) that comprise the most important part of the grant application.  Direct instruction on these topics will be accompanied by review of examples, application to participant’s own work, and discussion. Participants are expected to be familiar with the IES Request for Applications (see http://ies.ed.gov/funding/), to have the skills needed for such research, and to bring a research idea and outline of a research plan.


PDC17: Arts-Based Research: Pedagogy and Practice

Instructors:     Patricia Leavy, Independent Scholar; Kakali Bhattacharya, Kansas State University
Date:               Saturday, April 5, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
Fee:                 $55
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon F

This course will provide participants with an overview of arts-based research (ABR) as both a research methodology and pedagogical tool. Arts-based research is when researchers adapt the tenets of the creative arts in order to address their research questions and/or represent their research findings. The course will include a lecture, a question and answer period, an activity, and a debriefing discussion. Activities will include a guided free write and the chance to work more extensively in one genre of ABR: poetry/fiction, ethnodrama, visual representation (with instructor assistance). Participants are encouraged to bring some form of data (interviews, observations, documents, photographs, journals, etc.) for the workshop portion (but instructors can provide some for those who do not have any). Participants do not need to have any prior knowledge to take this course. All research experience levels are welcome.


PDC18: The Power of Existing Databases: Analyzing the High School Transcript Study Data for Educational Research

Instructors:     Janis D. Brown, U.S. Department of Education; Stephen E. Roey, Westat;  Jennifer Laird, MPR Associates, Inc.;  Robert Colby Perkins, Westat
Date:               Saturday, April 5, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon C

This course will provide graduate students, advanced data analysts, and researchers with information on how to access and analyze the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) High School Transcript Study (HSTS) data.  Topics covered in this course will include: 1) the HSTS survey design; 2) technical issues in the proper use and handling of sampling weights and plausible values; and 3) a discussion and demonstration of various specialized software for accessing and analyzing HSTS data. The course will also include extensive demonstrations, independent exercises, and group discussions.  Full participation will require a laptop with wireless capability.


PDC19: How to Get Published: Guidance from Emerging and Senior Scholars

Instructors:     Patricia A. Alexander, University of Maryland – College Park; Sandra Loughlin, University of Maryland – College Park; Emily Grossnickle, University of Maryland – College Park; Alexandra List, University of Maryland – College Park; Jeffery A. Greene, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Matthew McCrudden, Victoria, University of Wellington, New Zealand; Panayiota Kendeou, Neapolis University Pafos, Cyprus; Gregory Hancock, University of Maryland – College Park; Diane Schallert, University of Texas, Austin; Sofie Loyens, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands; DeLeon Gray, North Carolina State University
Date:               Saturday, April 5, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon E

Course will be available through the AERA-Virtual Research Learning Center. This course will provide graduate students and early career faculty with critical information about how to publish. The course will feature two panels: emerging scholars who have learned how to navigate the complex and demanding publication process successfully, and senior scholars who have acquired expertise in foundational aspects of publication. Instructors will present an overview of the publishing process, from conceptualizing studies to preparing well-crafted manuscripts and from submission through review and resubmission. Question and answer sessions will follow both presentations by the emerging scholars and the senior scholars. Each participant will be provided with materials including handouts, work samples, and correspondence that elaborate the important points shared during the course.


PDC20: Educational Neuroscience: Methods and Applications 

Instructor:     Stephen R. Campbell, Simon Fraser University 
Date:               Sunday, April 6, 8:00 am–12:00 pm 
Fee:                 $55
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon C 

Attendees of this course will be introduced to methods, applications, and related initiatives and issues pertaining to educational neuroscience, such as outreach and neuroethics. Methods include acquisition tools ranging from electroencephalography (EEG) and,eye-tracking (ET) to audiovisual, screen and keyboard capture, and data analysis techniques for processing EEG and ET data. The course will address ways to integrate synchronize, and interpret diverse forms of data. Applications include qualitative and quantitative research in mathematics education and educational psychology. This course is geared toward those recognizing that cognition and learning are deeply embodied phenomena and will be of particular interest and benefit to new and seasoned educational researchers potentially seeking to incorporate similar approaches and/or facilities within their own research and institutions.


PDC21: Propensity Score Matching Using R

Instructors:     Haiyan Bai, University of Central Florida; Wei Pan, Duke University; Christopher M. Swoboda, University of Cincinnati
Date:               Sunday, April 6, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon D

Through lectures and hands-on activities, this course will introduce basic concepts of propensity score matching (PSM) and the use of R packages for PSM. This course is appropriate for faculty members, graduate students, and applied researchers.  Participants will learn why and when researchers need PSM and how to perform PSM using R packages. Instructions for downloading and installing R software and related packages as well as example datasets will be provided to participants in advance through a course website. No prior knowledge of R or PSM is required, but a basic understanding of t-test and logistic regression is desirable. Participants are encouraged to bring their own PC or Mac laptops for hands-on activities.


PDC22: Mapping Your Educational Research: Putting Spatial Concepts into Practice with GIS

Instructors:     Mark Hogrebe, Washington University in St. Louis; Doug Geverdt, U.S. Census Bureau
Date:               Sunday, April 6, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon E

Course will be available through the AERA-Virtual Research Learning Center. This course introduces geographic information systems technology (GIS) as a means to help researchers investigate the spatial context of education. Education has spatial context because schools are located in areas of metropolitan regions and neighborhoods that influence learning and teaching. This course provides a basic overview of GIS concepts, presents unique features of spatial data, demonstrates methods to analyze spatial relationships, and discusses online and desktop solutions for developing maps to analyze data and visualize research results. Course surveys concepts and definitions of census geography, and reviews geodemographic data resources available from federal agencies for use in educational research. Participants will use online and mapping software in hands-on exercises with their laptops to investigate demographic, geographic, educational, and administrative data.


PDC23: Doing Qualitative Research: A Course for Beginners 

Instructors:     Erin Horvat, Temple University; Bradley W. Bergey, Temple University; Ginger McCartney, Temple University; Erin Cassar, Temple University; Myla Morris, Temple University; Erin Rooney, Temple University
Date:               Sunday, April 6, 8:00 am–12:00 pm 
Fee:                 $55
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon B 

Based on student-generated questions and concerns, this “hands on” course uses a mix of discussion and small group activities to address key issues faced by beginners to qualitative research. This introductory workshop focuses on 1) strategies for overcoming common challenges encountered in learning the craft of doing high quality qualitative research and 2) helping students to develop a roadmap for building qualitative research skills.   Participants will leave the workshop with an understanding of the general principles guiding high quality qualitative inquiry, concrete practice putting those principles to work, and resources for continuing to develop skills and knowledge.


 

PDC24: Cultural Historical Activity Theory Methodologies in the 21st Century: The Intersections of Theory, Research, Policy and Praxis

Instructors:     Emily Duvall, University of Idaho; Carrie L. Lobman, Rutgers University; Alvira Souza Lima, Brazilian Ministry of Education; Elina Lampert-Shepel, Walden University; Ana Marjanovic-Shane, Chestnut Hill College; Lois Holzman, East Side Institute; Ana C. Iddings, The University of Arizona; Jaime E. Martinez, New York Institute of Technology; Natalia Gajdamaschko, Simon Fraser University
Date:               Sunday, April 6, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $55
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon F

The course is designed to support graduate students’ and early and mid-career scholars’ research through the systematic acquisition and interpretation of a significant body of knowledge accumulated by more advanced Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) scholars in recent years. This course emphasizes the application of CHAT theory to the study and development of educational practices across a range of ages and settings, with an emphasis on practices that place cultural tools and learning activity at the center of attempts to understand “the relationship of education and poverty.”  Participants will develop their understanding of a variety of CHAT methodologies including mediated action, development of higher psychological functions, and play and learning activity in the tradition of Vygotsky and those that have further developed his work. The course will provide direct and intensive instruction from experts in the field and establish a network of continuing support for their research. A basic understanding of CHAT and its methods is recommended but not required.


 

PDC25: Using Multilevel Modeling to Meta-Analyze Single-Case Experimental Design Studies’ Results

Instructors:     Susan Natasha Beretvas, The University of Texas - Austin; Wim Van den Noortgate, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven;  John M. Ferron, University of South Florida
Date:               Sunday, April 6, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $95
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon E

This course introduces graduate students and researchers to the use of multilevel models for meta-analyzing single-subject experimental design (SSED) studies and demonstrates how to complement visual analysis inferences with multilevel model analysis results. Participants only need be familiar with multiple regression analysis. The course will begin with an overview of multilevel modeling and how the model can be used for SSED meta-analysis of unstandardized data. Next, an overview of how to standardize and meta-analyze the standardized data will be demonstrated. Multiple, real-world examples will be provided as well as opportunities for guided practice for participants in the form of a series of hands-on activities. Copies of commented SAS, R, and HLM code and output for every analysis will be provided.


 

PDC26: Longitudinal Surveys at the National Center for Education Statistics: High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09)

Instructor:      Elise Christopher, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education
Date:               Sunday, April 6, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Fee:                 $55
Location:        Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Fifth Level - Salon D

This course will inform researchers about the design, structure, components, and use of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). HSLS:09 collected data from students, school administrators, school counselors, math and science teachers, and parents.  This is the first National Center for Education Statistics longitudinal study to begin with a 9th grade cohort and to collect data immediately after high school graduation about students' postsecondary activities. The HSLS:09 cohort will be followed through postsecondary experiences and into initial employment to understand their decision-making about college enrollment and financing, and careers, especially in science and math. Participants should have an understanding of statistics and bring laptops to access the public use data.

 
 
Register for Courses
Print
Onsite Courses
To register for onsite courses, login, go to My AERA, and click View or Add Events to Existing Registration.

Live-stream VRLC Courses
To register for live-stream courses, visit the Virtual Research Learning Center
 
Designed by Weber-Shandwick   Powered by eNOAH